WashULaw supports a broad variety of student groups representing a wide spectrum of opinion.  These groups contribute immeasurably to the vitality of our community and provide many students with a place to advocate, serve, and otherwise engage in the larger academic, social, and legal worlds.  To further a free and robust exchange of ideas, WashULaw does not impose any restriction on the content of these sites, but does not directly endorse the opinions or viewpoints represented therein.

  • American Constitution Society (ACS)

    The American Constitution Society for Law and Policy (ACS) is one of the nation’s leading progressive legal organizations. Founded in 2001, ACS is comprised of law students, lawyers, scholars, judges, policymakers and other concerned individuals who understand the importance of the fundamental principles of respect for human dignity, protection of individual rights and liberties, genuine equality, and access to justice. ACS is working every day to restore these principles to their rightful – and traditionally central – place in American Law.

  • Asian Pacific American Law Students Association (APALSA)

    Asian Pacific American Law Students Association’s mission is to address issues surrounding diversity and inclusion in the legal community, locally, and nationally.

    The APALSA chapter of Washington University in St. Louis is primarily composed of Asian American law students at WashULaw but welcomes participation from ALL law students interested in Asian Pacific American issues.

  • Black Law Students Association (BLSA)

    The Black Law Students Association exists to support its members, focusing on the concerns of Black and other minority students, in their pursuit of success in law school. Founded in 1973, our organization has maintained a strong commitment to the St. Louis community throughout its history.

  • China Law Society (CLS)

    China Law Society is a law student organization at WashULaw dedicated to helping law students interested in Chinese Law or practicing law in the greater China region. CLS reaches out of the law school to develop new connections with employers in the greater China region and employers in the US with a Chinese background. CLS also has local connections with professionals that are able to provide more information about St. Louis and Missouri.

  • Community Development, Housing & Real Estate Law Society (CHRELS)

    CHRELS is committed to engaging with how the law intersects with urban development and policy, including but not limited to: community development–how communities are shaped, for what and for whom; housing–where and how do people and communities live; and real estate–what legal and financial decisions go into shaping our built environment.

  • Criminal Law Society

    The Criminal Law Society is an organization meant to bring law students interested in criminal law together and to service the wider WashULaw community with interesting speakers and other events tied to criminal law.

  • Energy & Environmental Law Society (EELS)

    The Energy & Environmental Law Society (“EELS”) explores the intersection of law and the environment through educational speaking events, community service projects, collaboration with other campus groups, and by promoting sustainability in the use of law school facilities.

  • Federalist Society

    The Federalist Society is a national organization that seeks to promote an awareness of the principles that the state exists to preserve freedom, that the separation of governmental powers is central to the Constitution, and that the responsibility of the judiciary is to describe rather than prescribe the law. The local chapter strives to stimulate discussion of federalism issues by sponsoring debates, speakers, and other events to stimulate dialogue.

    Join the national Federalist Society

  • Graduate Professional Council (GPC)

    What does the Graduate Professional Council (GPC) do? As your representative body, we aim to advocate for all 6,000+ graduate and professional students at WashU; encourage interschool and interdisciplinary cooperation within the university; organize campus-wide social events open to all graduate & professional students; and support other [school, department, or interest specific] graduate & professional student organizations.

  • Health Law Association

    The Health Law Association is comprised of students interested in the field of health law and medical malpractice. As a whole, the Association is committed to promoting awareness of and pursuing careers in these fields. We are dedicated to heightening awareness of health law issues and opportunities within the student body.

  • If/When/How - Lawyering for Reproductive Justice

    If/When/How was started because of a belief that individuals, not governments, have the right to make decisions about their reproductive health. Every person, regardless of gender, race, class, or ethnicity has the right to choose whether or not to have sex, use contraception, or have a child.  Today, only a few law schools offer comprehensive education in reproductive rights law and opportunities for professional training are scarce.  As individuals, each of us faces difficulties obtaining the education and training we need to become strong, successful advocates for reproductive rights.  Together, we can change this situation and become a powerful, educated force that defends and expands reproductive rights in the United States and around the world.

  • Immigration Law Society (ImmLS)

    The Immigration Law Society (ImmLS) seeks to engage the law student community in a fair and balanced dialogue about immigration issues nationally and locally through speaker and panel events, advocacy and awareness projects, and volunteer activities. In addition to engaging with the local immigrant and refugee populations in St. Louis, we hope to provide law students with more opportunities to gain legal experience as well as exposure to diverse communities. ImmLS always welcomes new members and collaborations with other student groups, so please contact anyone on the Planning Committee if you would like to join or submit ideas.

  • Intellectual Property Law Society (IPLS)

    The Intellectual Property Law Society (IPLS) seeks to encourage and promote student interest in intellectual property law. In addition to providing a forum for the exchange of information and ideas in intellectual property law, the IPLS sponsors speakers, seminars, and conferences that cover a wide variety of current topics in patent, trademark, and copyright law. The organization also participates in events sponsored by counterpart organizations at other area law schools.

  • International Law Society

    The International Law Society at WashULaw is an organization dedicated to the pursuit of academic and professional opportunities in private and public international law. Our goals include connecting students with peers and professionals in the community with international legal experience and promoting the proliferation of international legal knowledge through seminars and academic panels. To the latter end, we work closely with the brilliant minds at the Whitney R. Harris World Law Institute.

    We hope to bring global perspectives to our small corner of St. Louis.

  • Jewish Law Society (JLS)

    The Jewish Law Society (JLS) seeks to foster a Jewish community in the law school by engaging both students and faculty through various social and cultural events, including happy hours, holiday celebrations, student/faculty dinners, and philanthropic activities. In addition, the JLS cosponsors events with other Jewish graduate student associations on campus to create a sense of campus-wide community among the graduate student population.

  • Latin American Law Students Association (LALSA)

    The Latin American Law Student Association (LALSA) aims to foster an environment conducive of awareness and appreciation for all things concerning the racial and culturally diverse aspects of the many nations that fall under the Hispanic/Latino umbrella. As such, LALSA is open to any member of the WashULaw School community who wishes to immerse or further understand the Latino culture. LALSA also aims to serve as a home-away-from-home for Hispanic and Latino students who are moving to the Midwest.

  • Native American Law Student Association (NALSA)

    The Native American Law Student Association (NALSA) is a student-led organization made up of Native and non-Native students. Our purpose is to provide a safe and supportive community, while promoting opportunities for Native and indigenous law students throughout law school and into the legal community. Valuing diversity, we welcome all students who are interested in the unique and varied cultures of Native peoples, Alaskan Natives, and other indigenous communities. We seek to expose students, staff, and faculty of WashULaw to the legal challenges faced by Native and indigenous communities at the local, state and federal levels. We advocate for diversity at WashULaw and a greater understanding of the unique challenges faced by Native and indigenous people within WashULaw and the community.

  • OUTLaw

    OUTLaw is an educational, political, and social alliance of law students, faculty, staff, and alumni interested in working with Washington University and the surrounding community towards fostering and maintaining an environment that is supportive, positive, and safe for individuals of sexual and gender diversity. In striving for a greater understanding of sexuality and gender issues at WashULaw and within the affiliated communities, OUTLaw aims to address the legal issues associated with sexual and gender diversity and to provide resources and support for social activism.

  • Negotiation & Dispute Resolution Society
  • Phi Alpha Delta

    Founded in 1902, PAD is the largest co-ed professional law fraternity in the US, with over 300,000 members, including college students, law students, lawyers, judges, and politicians. Approximately one in every six US lawyers is a PAD member. Five of the sitting Justices of the United States Supreme Court are members of PAD. From 1964 to 1968, Tom C. Clark, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, served as Supreme Vice Justice of the Fraternity. Additionally, one of five of all Federal judges and three of ten of all State judges are PAD members. Six US Presidents have likewise been members of PAD.

  • Public Service Advisory Board (PSAB)

    The Public Service Advisory Board, known as PSAB, is a strong, active student group focused on creating opportunities to do public service within WashULaw school and the larger St. Louis community. All PSAB members belong to one of four committees, each with its own mission.

  • South Asian Law Students Association (SALSA)

    The South Asian Law Student Association (SALSA) of WashULaw is a group that brings together law students interested in South Asia, provides a forum to discuss South Asian issues and affairs, and develops opportunities to study and work in South Asia. SALSA sponsors and co-sponsors a number of events throughout the year with these goals in mind.

  • Sports & Entertainment Law (SELS)

    Washington University Sports and Entertainment Law Society (SELS) is an organization of students with an interest in Sports and/or Entertainment Law. The purpose of the SELS is to provide a resource for those with an interest in these fields as well as to provide a social function within WashULaw. Events range from sponsoring speakers to hosting receptions and other events.

  • Student Bar Association (SBA)

    The Student Bar Association (SBA) is the representative organization of WashULaw School student body. Each class (1Ls, 2Ls, 3Ls, and LLMs) is represented by a number of delegates equal to five percent of that class’ population.

  • The Student Veterans Association (SVA)

    The goal of the Student Veterans of America (SVA) chapter at WashU School of Law is to provide military veterans with the resources, support, and advocacy needed to succeed in higher education and following graduation.

  • Technology & Privacy Society

    The Technology and Privacy Society seeks to educate the WashULaw community on pressing issues in data privacy and ethics. We organize events to engage students and foster discussion on topics like data protection policies and genomics. The Society also serves as a networking organization for students and the privacy community at large.

  • Women’s Law Caucus (WLC)

    The Women’s Law Caucus (WLC), founded in 1972, strives to emphasize the development and achievements of women in the field of law, while fostering relationships among law students, faculty and the community at large. As one of the largest and most active student-run organizations at WashULaw, the WLC seeks to educate students about issues facing women in the legal field, and to inspire members to overcome gender-based barriers. Through public service projects and outreach to leading female lawyers and academics, our members build foundations for their futures in law. The value of the organization lies in our diverse backgrounds and experiences; we seek to cultivate a stimulating and supportive environment where students can equally contribute to, and share in, this resource. The Women’s Law Caucus is the largest student-run group at WashULaw.

  • Women of Color Law Society (WCLS)

    The Women of Color Law Society (WCLS) was created to provide a supportive space for women of color students at WashULaw. Through supportive networking, public education, and collective initiatives, WCLS seeks to advance the needs of women of color and thereby enrich the educational experience at WashULaw.