WHY ST. LOUIS?
As some readers might already be aware, St. Louis is not located in either the Washington, DC or New York metropolitan areas. Nor is it anywhere near London, Hong Kong, or Tokyo. So why would anyone want to start an institute for global legal studies in St. Louis?

U. City Loop
Café life in the University City loop, a short walk from the Washington University campus.
A large part of the answer lies with Washington University itself. As other articles in this brochure point out, both the University and the School of Law have a longstanding international orientation and great international strengths. In a very real sense, the Institute is simply gathering and grafting onto those existing traditions and strengths.

But much of the explanation lies with the city of St. Louis, a vibrant international metropolis with immigrant roots, a large foreign population, an international economy, and a rich cultural heritage. Home to the Human Genome Project, the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, and the Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis has long been one of the world's leading centers for international biological research. Indeed, as more and more private companies discover the commercial research opportunities in St. Louis, it is no exaggeration to say that metropolitan St. Louis is fast becoming the Silicon Valley of the biotech industry.

The good economic fortunes and the heightened international trade activity that St. Louis has enjoyed reflect two business trends. On the one hand, St. Louis has been receiving heavy media attention for the steady increase in small home-grown businesses. Industry Week Magazine

recently lauded St. Louis as an ideal location for manufacturing. On the other hand, St. Louis is 5th in the nation in the number of Fortune 500 company headquarters. Large corporations like TWA, Anheuser -Busch, Ralston Purina, Emerson Electric, May Department Stores, Monsanto, and others have helped to make St. Louis a center for high tech international trade and migration.

Aside from commercial activity, St. Louis is home to a network of nongovernmental organizations passionately involved in international issues. These include the International Institute of Metro St. Louis, the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, the International Relations Committee of the League of Women Voters, the St. Louis Human Rights Coalition, the Missouri Humanities Council, the St. Louis Holocaust Museum


As more and more private companies discover the commercial research opportunities in St. Louis, it is no exaggeration to say that metropolitan St. Louis is fast becoming the Silicon Valley of the biotech industry.
Union Station
Historic Union Station
and Learning Center, and the Wednesday Club. St. Louis also has active chapters of the Red Cross, the United Nations Association, the World Affairs Council, and Amnesty International. Nearby universities like St. Louis University and the University of Missouri at St. Louis, as well as a number of smaller colleges, enhance the intellectual and international vibrancy of the entire metro area.


Downtown St. Louis
The St. Louis Gateway Arch on the Fourth of July, with the old federal courthouse in the foreground and the Mississippi River in the background.