2013 January Intersession - Course Directory and Registration

SESSION DATES:  Monday, January 7, through Friday, January 11, 2013

(see class times in the course descriptions below)

  • CREDIT:  All are 1 unit courses. The 1 unit counts toward a student's total spring semester units for purposes of full-time status (but does not count toward the spring semester units for purposes of determining if a law student is over the limit of 17 units).
  • ELIGIBILITY TO ENROLL:  Upper-level law students are eligible to take these courses, including 2L, 3L, LLM, JSD, and MJS students.  Washington University graduate-level students are eligible, as are WashU upper-level juniors and seniors. (First-year JDs are not eligible to take these courses and are required to take Negotiation and attend career services programming during the intersession week.)  Students may take only one of these courses during the January Intersession.
  • TUITION: There is no additional charge beyond the spring semester tuition for full-time Washington University law students in degree programs or for visiting law students who are paying full-time tuition. Full-time non-law Washington University graduate students may not have to pay extra for a law school intersession course, but should confirm this with their department. For those who must pay tuition, the cost is $1,960. 
  • PRE-REQUISITES: Read course descriptions carefully and take note of any co/pre-requisites, recommended courses, or other course eligibility requirements.
  • EXAMS:  Most courses require a take-home exam that will be available via MyLaw on the afternoon of Friday, Jan. 11, 2013, and will be due by 8:00am on Monday, Jan. 14, 2013 (read course descriptions for specifics about each course). MyLaw is web-based, so students are not required to be in St. Louis when taking an intersession exam.
  • PRE-REGISTRATION:  Begins Thursday, October 25, and ends at 9:00am on Thursday, November 1. Interested students should click on the link found below under 'PRE-REGISTRATION FORM". This online form may be used by all interested students - WU Law, SLU Law, non-law students, etc.
    • All students must indicate at least FIVE choices when submitting the online form.
    • Students will be notified of the course they are placed in prior to the start of online registration for the regular Spring 2013 semester (likely by Monday, Nov. 12). Although students cannot be guaranteed that they will get into a particular course, there should be no problem placing everyone into one of the courses. Priority will be based on seniority (those graduating in May 2013 will have priority over others graduating later). There is no advantage to pre-registering quickly, just as long as you register by the November 1st deadline. If a student is placed in a course that is not their first choice, they will automatically be placed on the waitlist(s) for their preferred course(s).
    • AFTER PRE-REGISTRATION PERIOD: After November 1st, interested students should contact Colleen Erker, Assistant Dean for Academic Services & Registrar, at erker@wustl.edu.
    • DROP DEADLINE:  The drop deadline for these courses is Friday, November 30, 2012. 
    • NON-LAW STUDENTS:  Non-law graduate-level students are welcome to take these courses and should follow the same registration instructions as law students. Some upper-level undergraduate students (juniors and seniors) may be eligible to take these courses and should follow the same instructions as graduate-level students. Non-law students must additionally complete an approval form, click here to view. (which involves obtaining their departmental approval - either in the form of a signature on the form or via an email from their department/advisor stapled to the form); however, non-law students can assume professor approval. Freshmen and sophomores are not eligible to take law school courses.  

PRE-REGISTRATION FORM

Click here to submit your pre-registration form, beginning Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012 at Noon.
 [Deadline to submit: Thursday, Nov 1, 2012. After this date, interested students should contact Colleen Erker at erker@wustl.edu.]

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


Animal Law

Enrollment Limit: 30. This course will provide an overview of the emerging field of animal law. Animal law is intrinsically connected to many other substantive areas of law including property, torts, constitutional law, domestic relations, wills and trusts, and criminal law. Focusing on recent case and legislative developments, students will analyze this emerging legal framework. These cases and statutes will also be used to re-analyze principles of traditional legal jurisprudence, including: the legal relevance of sentience in a property status classification; consideration of where rights vest, in the one a statute seeks to protect or the guardian seeking to enforce those rights; the preservation of evidence when the evidence is an animal; and standing as a barrier to the judicial consideration of emerging claims, among others. This course will address the need for inclusion of scientific, economic, policy and other perspectives to craft appropriate legal solutions to ethical dilemmas. Students will be encouraged to actively and respectfully participate in class discussions regarding controversial topics and contribute their views to the conversation. Grading will be modified pass/fail (HP94, P, LP 78, F70) and will be based on preparation and participation for class discussions (30%), an in-class exercise (30%), and a take-home exam essay which will be uploaded via the MyLaw take-home exam site, which will be available by the afternoon of Fri., Jan. 11, and will remain open until the exam is due by 8:00 a.m. on Tues., Jan. 15. 1 unit.

Class times:  MTuWThF 1:00p-3:30p (January 7-11, 2013)

Professor: Kathy Hessler [view profile]

Changing Law and Legal Conciousness in Japan

This course will introduce students to the phenomena of changing the law and legal consciousness in Japan by dealing with a wide variety of the recent business law issues. After a brief overview of the Japanese legal system, this course will cover selected topics of contract and commercial transactions, corporation law and dispute resolution in Japan. Concretely, this course is divided into three parts. Part One will explore the differences between Japanese laws and US laws. Specifically, we will discuss some scholarly theories addressing how Japanese law is unique. Part Two will examine the new Japanese statute (Companies Act of 2005), some case laws of corporation and other business laws, and discuss corporate governance issues (including recent controversy over the amendment of Companies Act) and the general characteristics of corporate law and society from a Japanese and US comparative perspective. We will also overview various business laws, including employment laws, anti-monopoly laws and intellectual property laws. Finally, Part Three provides the dispute resolution process, including the comparison of litigation and arbitration.

Grading will be modified pass/fail (HP94, P, LP78, F70), and will be based on a take-home written examination (and class attendance, preparation, and participation may be taken into consideration). The take-home exam will be administered via MyLaw on the afternoon of Friday, January 11, and will be due by 8:00 a.m. on Tuesday, January 15.  1 unit.

Class times:  MTuWThF 1:00p-3:30p  (January 7-11, 2013)

Professor: Professor Yoichiro Hamabe [view profile]

Chapter 11 Strategies for the Business Lawyer

This course will provide the foundation for understanding chapter 11 bankruptcy cases from inception to conclusion. Class discussion will be based on a hypothetical problem modeled after current bankruptcy cases, and students will have the opportunity to learn chapter 11 strategies from the perspective of various parties in interest, including secured and unsecured creditors, equity holders, and the corporate debtor. This class will cover the essential elements of corporate bankruptcies ranging from the automatic stay, property of the estate, fraudulent transfers, and preferences through contested plan confirmation and post-confirmation liquidating trusts. Bankruptcy is not a prerequisite. The take-home exam will be administered via MyLaw on the afternoon of Friday, January 11, and will be due by 8:00 a.m. on Tuesday, January 15.  1 unit.

Class times:  MTuWThF 1:00p-3:30p (January 7-11, 2013)

Professor: Jill Nicholson [view profile]

Electronic Evidence in the Age of Cloud Computing

Enrollment Limit: 35. Students who have completed Evidence are eligible to take this class. Computers and electronic devices have changed the way we communicate, and electronically stored information (“ESI”) is quickly changing the cost and dynamics of litigation. In this course we will review the basics of computer files, storage and retrieval, and computer forensics, and will examine what some of this ESI looks like. We will then explore E-discovery, including the E-discovery rules, triggers and preservation, proportionality and cooperation, spoliation and sanctions. Finally, we will focus on the evidentiary aspects of ESI, including privilege and FRE Rule 502, and how rules such as authentication, relevance, prejudice, best evidence and hearsay apply in the electronic world. Attendance will be taken each day. Grading will be modified pass/fail (HP94, P, LP78, F70), and will be based on a take-home written examination (and class attendance, preparation, and participation may be taken into consideration). The take-home final will be administered via the MyLaw take-home exam site, which will be available by the afternoon of Friday, January 11, and will remain open until the examination is due, by 8:00 am on Tuesday, January 15. 1 unit.

Class times:  MTuWThF 9:00a-11:30a (January 7-11, 2013)

Professors: Judge Audrey Fleissig and John F. Cowling [view profiles]

International Tax Treaties

This course will provide both a theoretical and practical framework on tax treaties signed by two countries. It will also cover the key issues in connection with the economic effects of these treaties on foreign direct investments by multinational companies and the impact on the fiscal revenues of countries. The course will be divided into three sections. The first part will address tax policy issues related to tax treaties and the main tax provisions included in the OECD, UN and US Models. The second part will address the effects of tax treaties on foreign direct investment analyzing whether the loss of revenues derived from reducing withholding taxes under a treaty will attract greater investment by international companies. The third will analyze, from a practical perspective, the main provisions of the US-Chile Tax Treaty (the “Treaty”) including tax planning issues and its interaction with the domestic laws of both countries. In particular, the last section of the course will review the Treaty scope and terminology, the taxation of business profits and permanent establishment, taxation of dividends, royalties, interest, capital gains, services and the application of anti-avoidance provisions included in the Treaty such as the LOB clause. Grading will be modified pass/fail (HP94, P, LP78, F70), and will be based on a take-home written examination (class attendance, preparation and participation may also be taken into consideration). The take-home examination will be administered via MyLaw - it will be available on the afternoon of Friday, January 11, and will be due by 8:00 a.m. on Tuesday, January 15.  1 unit.

Class times:  MTuWThF 9:00a-11:30a (January 7-11, 2013)

Professor: Professor Hugo Hurtado [view profile]

Introduction to Law Firm Practice

Enrollment Limit: 45. Most law school graduates enter private practice. This course attempts to prepare them for some of the daily challenges they will encounter in such a setting by teaching them how law firms are structured, how they generate revenue and compensate lawyers, and how they develop business. It will also discuss issues such as what law firms value, how lawyers bill time, and how to deal with co-workers and clients. Teaching methods will include role play and other creative techniques. Grading will be modified pass/fail (HP94, P, LP78, F70) and based on participation and a reflective journal. Grading for this course will not be anonymous. The journal will be uploaded via the MyLaw take-home exam site, which will be available Friday, January 11, and will remain open until the journal is due, by 8:00 a.m. on Tuesday, January 15. 1 unit.

Class times:  MTuWThF 9:00a-11:30a (January 7-11, 2013)

Professor: Michael Downey [view profile]

The Lawyer's Role in Urban Revitalization: St. Louis as a Case Study

The problems of a struggling city are shaped by – and arguably can be addressed through – local government law, the structures of municipal institutions, private sector interests, and the practicalities of politics. This course will use local government law to examine some of the institutional and public policy challenges facing St. Louis and examine potential pathways to growth for the city. Each session will couple local government law doctrines with a particular “public problem” faced by St. Louis: inner city decline vs. suburban growth, economic development in a fragmented landscape, issues of inequity, and regional governance. It will put students in the position of serving as legal and policy advisers and, ultimately, decision makers with the goal of challenging students to think strategically about the trade-offs decision-makers face. To this end, a final, 5-7 page writing assignment will require students to analyze one specific public problem from the larger subset of course themes and apply local government law doctrines covered in class in developing possible solutions. Grading will be based on class participation and the final memo. In addition, students will be expected to hold time for two afternoon site visits in St. Louis: Tuesday, January 8 from 1-4pm and Thursday, January 10 from 1-4pm. These site visits will be in addition to regular class time. More details will be forthcoming to enrolled students. The final memo will be uploaded via the MyLaw take-home exam site, which will be available Friday, January 11, and will remain open until the memo is due, by 8:00 a.m. on Tuesday, January 15.  1 unit.

Class times:  MTuWThF 9:00a-11:30a (January 7-11, 2013)

Professor: Ryan Rippel [view profile]

Private Equity Transactions

This course will examine from a practical perspective the issues and documentation arising in a typical private equity acquisition transaction, using a mixture of lectures, cases and guest speakers. The course will begin with a basic introduction to the private equity industry, including the roles of the various business and legal participants, and will then focus on the structure, negotiation and documentation of a private equity investment transaction. Overall, the course is intended as a survey/introductory course, rather than an in-depth analysis of any particular area of law or type of document. Time will be set aside for discussions about current events and careers in the private equity industry. Grading will be modified pass/fail (HP94, P, LP78, F70).  Class attendance, preparation, and participation are expected and may be taken into consideration in the final grade. There will be a take-home exam administered via MyLaw. The exam will be available on the afternoon of Fri., Jan. 11, and will due by 8:00 a.m. on Tues., Jan. 15.  1 unit.

Class times: MTuWThF 9:00a-11:30a  (January 7-11, 2013)

Professors: Michael Paley and Brian Wolfe [view profiles]

Sex Offenders in the Community: The Legal Response

Enrollment Limit: 40. This course will examine the various restrictions placed on persons convicted of sex offences by the legal system after their terms of incarceration are completed. Beginning with the Adam Walsh Act and similar statutes, the course will review legislative history, scope, and community impact of the legislation. Constitutional implications of sex offender registration, residence restrictions, community parole, and civil commitment of sexual predators will be studied through original materials. Methods for evaluating recidivism risk will be reviewed and discussed with the focus on the interplay between the legal and mental health systems. Students will be asked to evaluate the various regulatory schemes and to formulate their own proposal based on the concepts discussed. Grading will be modified pass/fail (HP94, P, LP78, F70), and will be based on a take-home written examination. While the written assignment will be given the greatest weight, class attendance, preparation, and participation are expected and will be taken into consideration in the final grade. The take-home examination will be uploaded via the MyLaw take-home exam site, which will be available Fri., Jan. 11, and will remain open until the examination is due, by 8:00 a.m. on Tues., Jan. 15. 1 unit.

Class times:  MTuWThF 1:00p-3:30p (January 7-11, 2013)

Professor: Joan Van Pelt [view profiles]