2011 January Intersession Course Directory and Registration

  • SESSION DATES AND TIMES:  Monday, January 10, through Friday, January 14, 2011 - 9:00am to 11:30am
  • CREDIT:  All are 1 unit courses. The 1 unit counts toward a student's total spring semester units for purposes of full-time status (but does not count toward the spring semester units for purposes of determining if a law student is taking an overload).
  • ELIGIBILITY TO ENROLL:  Upper-level law students are eligible to take these courses, including 2L, 3L, LLM, JSD, and MJS students.  Washington University graduate-level students are eligible, as are WashU upper-level juniors and seniors. (First-year JDs are not eligible to take these courses and are required to attend career services programming during the intersession week.)
  • TUITION: There is no additional charge beyond the spring semester tuition for full-time Washington University law students in degree programs or for visiting law students who are paying full-time tuition. Full-time non-law Washington University graduate students may not have to pay extra for a law school intersession course, but should confirm this with their department. For those who must pay tuition, the cost is $1,820.
  • PRE-REQUISITES: Read course descriptions carefully and take note of any co/pre-requisites, recommended courses, or other course related issues.
  • EXAMS:  Most courses require a take-home exam that will be available via MyLaw on the afternoon of Fri, Jan. 14, 2011, and will be due by 8:00am on Tues, Jan. 18, 2011 (read course descriptions for specifics about each course).
  • PRE-REGISTRATION:  Begins immediately and ends on Monday, October 25, 2010. Interested students should click on the link found below under 'PRE-REGISTRATION FORM". This online form may be used by all interested students - WU Law, SLU Law, non-law students, etc.
    • All students must indicate at least three choices when submitting the online form.
    • Students will be notified of the course they are placed in prior to the start of online registration for the regular Spring 2011 semester (likely by Wed, Nov. 3). Although students cannot be guaranteed that they will get into a particular course, there should be no problem placing everyone into one of the courses. Priority will be based on seniority (those graduating in May 2011 will have priority over others graduating later). There is no advantage to pre-registering quickly, just as long as you register by the Oct. 25th deadline. If a student is placed in a course that is not their first choice, they will be placed on a waitlist for their prefered course(s).
  • AFTER PRE-REGISTRATION PERIOD: After Oct. 25th, interested students should contact Colleen Erker, Assistant Dean for Academic Services & Registrar, at erker@wustl.edu.
  • DROP DEADLINE:  The drop deadline for these courses is Wednesday, Dec. 1
  • NON-LAW STUDENTS:  Non-law graduate-level students are welcome to take these courses and should follow the same registration instructions as law students. Some upper-level undergraduate students (juniors and seniors) may be eligible to take these courses and should follow the same instructions as graduate-level students. Non-law students must additionally complete an approval form found at http://law.wustl.edu/uploadedFiles/Registrar/Non-LawStudentInLawCourse.LatestVersion.pdf (which involves obtaining their departmental approval - either in the form of a signature on the form or via an email from their department/advisor); however, non-law students can assume professor approval. Freshmen and sophomores are not eligible to take law school courses.

PRE-REGISTRATION FORM

Click here to submit your pre-registration form [Deadline to submit:  Monday, Oct. 25, 2010.  After this date, interested students should contact Colleen Erker at erker@wustl.edu.]

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Advanced Chapter 11 Bankruptcy: Plan Prosecution and Confirmation Issues

Enrollment limit: 40.  In light of the economic crisis and the recent bankruptcy boom, this course will provide a detailed review of the chapter 11 process for commercial bankruptcies, including crafting the plan of reorganization, prepackaged plans, valuation disputes, competing creditor constituencies, cramdown, plan confirmation, and post-confirmation liquidation trusts. Students enrolling in this course will learn the fundamentals of the chapter 11 process beginning with the plan formation process through and after confirmation from both the creditor and debtor perspectives. Prior completion of a general bankruptcy course is recommended. Students who have taken Reorganization Seminar are not eligible to take this course. However, students who take this course are eligible to take Reorganization Seminar in a future semester. Students who took "Chapter 11: Strategies for the Business Lawyer" in January Intersession 2010, are eligible to take this course. Grading will be modified pass/fail (HP94, P, LP78, F70), and will be based on a take-home written examination (and class attendance, preparation, and participation may be taken into consideration). The take-home final will be available via MyLaw on Friday, January 14, and will be due by 8:00am on Tuesday, January 18. 1 unit.
Drop Deadline:  Wed, Dec. 1, 2010.
Days/times:  M, Jan 10  – F, Jan 14: 9:00a-11:30a
Course Number:  W74-645G, sec. 01 
Professor:  Jill Nicholson (Foley & Lardner)  [view profile

Changing Law and Legal Consciousness in Japan 

Enrollment limit: 40.  This course will introduce students to the phenomena of changing the law and legal consciousness in Japan by dealing with a wide variety of the recent business law issues. After a brief overview of the Japanese legal system, this course will cover selected topics of contract and commercial transactions, corporation law and dispute resolution in Japan. Concretely, this course is divided into three parts. Part One will explore the differences between Japanese laws and US laws. Specifically, we will discuss some scholarly theories addressing how Japanese law is unique. Part Two will examine the new Japanese statute (Companies Act of 2005), some case laws of corporation and other business laws, and discuss the general characteristics of corporate law and society from a Japanese and US comparative perspective. We will also overview various business laws, including employment law, anti-monopoly law and intellectual property laws. Finally, Part Three provides the dispute resolution process, including the comparison of litigation and arbitration. Grading will be modified pass/fail (HP94, P, LP78, F70), and will be based on a take-home written examination (and class attendance, preparation, and participation may be taken into consideration). The take-home final will be available via MyLaw on Friday, January 14, and will be due by 8:00am on Tuesday, January 18. 1 unit.
Drop Deadline:  Wed, Dec. 1, 2010.
Days/times:  M, Jan 10 – F, Jan 14: 9:00a-11:30a
Course Number:  W74-670C, sec. 01
Professor:  Professor Yoichiro Hamabe, (Aoyama Gakuin Law School (Tokyo)) [view profile]

Introduction to Law Firm Practice

Enrollment limit: 40.  Most law school graduates enter private practice. This course attempts to prepare them for some of the daily challenges they will encounter in such a setting by teaching them how law firms are structured, how they generate revenue and compensate lawyers, and how they develop business. It will also discuss issues such as what law firms value, how lawyers bill time, and how to deal with co-workers and clients. Teaching methods will include role play and other creative techniques. Grading will be modified pass/fail (HP94, P, LP78, F70) and based on participation and a reflective journal. Grading for this course will not be anonymous. 1 unit.
Drop Deadline:  Wed, Dec. 1, 2010.
Days/times:  M, Jan 10 – F, Jan 14: 9:00a-11:30a
Course Number:  W74-561E, sec. 01
Professor:  Michael Downey (Hinshaw & Culbertson) [view profile]

Israeli Constitutional Law

Enrollment limit: 40.  Most countries in the world have a written constitution. Very few countries don't have a formal constitution. Israel is the only country where this question is still debatable. Upon its establishment, the founding fathers decided to have a written constitution yet the constituent assembly disassembled without adopting one. Instead, the Knesset was entrusted with enacting Basic Laws, the legal status of which was controversial for many years. A decade and a half ago the Supreme Court declared – in a move criticized by many as a "putsch" – that Israel does have a constitution and the Court possesses judicial review powers. We will deal with this issue in our course. We will review the institutions of the State with special emphasis on the courts, which granted themselves unprecedented review powers. We will deal also with emergency laws and the status of human rights. We will examine the definition of Israel as "a Jewish and Democratic State". Finally, we will deal with the legal status of the occupied territories. Grading will be modified pass/fail (HP94, P, LP78, F70), and will be based on a take-home written examination (and class attendance, preparation, and participation may be taken into consideration). The take-home final will be available via MyLaw on Friday, January 14, and will be due by 8:00am on Tuesday, January 18. 1 unit.
Drop Deadline:  Wed, Dec. 1, 2010.
Days/times:  M, Jan 10 – F, Jan 14: 9:00a-11:30a
Course Number:  W74-535G, sec. 01
Professor:  Professor Asher Maoz (University of Tel. Aviv)  [view profile]

Negotiation

Enrollment limit: 50  [40 law students + 10 non-law students; Students who have taken Mediation Theory & Practice, Negotiation Theory & Practice, or Business Negotiation Theory & Practice are not eligible to take this course, and students may not take this course in the same semester as the aforementioned courses.  However, students who take Negotiation are eligible to take Mediation Theory & Practice, Negotiation Theory & Practice, or Business Negotiation Theory & Practice in a future semester, including the upcoming regular spring semester.]  This one unit pass/fail course will emphasize learning the skills of negotiation by simulations in which students will negotiate and watch their classmates negotiate. Some negotiations will be videotaped for review in class. Students will also be exposed to some of the basics of negotiation theory across a range of topics in negotiation, including distributive versus integrative bargaining, negotiation and power, and the psychology of negotiation. The readings for the course consist of Roger Fisher and William Ury, Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Harvard/Belknap Paperback) and other selected readings on negotiation that will be available via the course website prior to the beginning of the winter break. In addition to the simulations and discussion of the readings, there will be brief instruction on drafting agreements and advice about further steps to improve negotiation skills. Students who attend all class sessions, participate in good faith in the simulations, and do the readings will receive a pass for the course. (A passing grade will show on a student’s record as "CR", which stands for "Credit"; a student who does not pass the course risks receiving an F70, which would affect a law student's GPA.) Attendance will be taken each day. Enrollment limit: 50 [40 Law Students + 10 Non-Law Students]. 1 unit.
Drop Deadline:  Wed, Dec. 1, 2010.
Days/times:  M, Jan 10 – F, Jan 14: 9:00a-11:30a
Course Number:  W74-578G, sec. 01
Professor:  Professor C.J. Larkin (Washington University Law) [view profile]

Problems in Corporate Law  (Course Cancelled)

Real Estate Finance

Enrollment limit: 40.  The course is recommended for students who have completed first year Property and have a basic familiarity with real estate finance. We are living in unprecedented times in the real estate finance industry. Concepts of valuation, underwriting and loan structure are all in flux since the crash of the financial markets in the Fall of 2007. The course will be a forward-looking review of real estate finance and joint-venturing in the real estate context. The focus of the course will be a) an explanation of real estate financing techniques, securitization and the capital markets, b) what went wrong with the securitization model that came to a head in August, 2007 and c) what the future may look like for real estate finance. Through readings, case examples and student negotiation interplay, the course will also explore the different viewpoints of, and pressures on, buyers/sellers and owners/lenders in the real estate industry. Grading will be modified pass/fail (HP94, P, LP78, F70), and will be based on a take-home written examination (and class attendance, preparation, and participation may be taken into consideration). The take-home final will be available via MyLaw on Friday, January 14, and will be due by 8:00am on Tuesday, January 18. 1 unit. 
Drop Deadline:  Wed, Dec. 1, 2010.
Days/times:  M, Jan 10 – F, Jan 14: 9:00a-11:30a
Course Number:  W74-584A, sec. 01
Professor:  Robert J Grados (Haynes and Boone, LLP (NYC))  [view profile]

The Strategic Role of Courts from a Comparative Perspective

Course Canceled.

Drop Deadline: 
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