2010 January Intersession Course Directory and Websites

GENERAL INFORMATION

January 2010 Intersession classes will be held Monday, January 11, through Friday, January 15, from 9:00am to 11:30am - see course descriptions listed below. Most courses will require a take-home exam that will be distributed on the afternoon of Fri, Jan. 15, and will be due by 12:00 noon on Tues, Jan. 19 (read course descriptions for specifics about each course).  January Intersession courses are 1 unit courses and they count as part of the Spring 2010 semester.  Links to the course website are listed under the course name.

[view] Course Directory and Registration

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

BIOTECHNOLOGY LAW: FROM PATENTS TO FOOD-DRUG-PLANTING APPROVALS

 

W74-544D, section 01
This course will review the life cycle of biotechnology drugs and crops from patents through regulatory approvals and potential liability.  Laws at the state, federal and international level will be introduced along with key cases establishing the boundaries of patents for life and approvals of biotech crops and drugs. The final grade on this course will be on a modified pass/fail basis (HP94, P, LP78, F70) and will be based on a take-home written examination (and class attendance, preparation, and participation may be taken into consideration). The take-home final will be distributed on Friday, January 15, and will be due at 12:00 noon on Tuesday, January 19. 1 unit.
Days/times:  M, Jan 11 – F, Jan 15:  9:00a-11:30a
Professors:  Thomas Parker Redick [view profile] and
Kevin Buckley [view profile]
Course website: [view] (MyLaw-password required)

CHAPTER 11: STRATEGIES FOR THE BUSINESS LAWYER

 

W74-645F, section 01
This course will provide the foundation essential for any business lawyer in today's corporate world where chapter 11 "mega" cases frequently intersect with corporate and litigation matters.  Class discussion will be based on a hypothetical problem modeled after current bankruptcy cases, and students will have the opportunity to learn chapter 11 strategies from the perspective of secured and unsecured creditors, indenture trustees, venture capital, equity holders, and the corporate debtor. This class will cover the essential elements of corporate bankruptcies ranging from the automatic stay, fraudulent transfers, and preferences through plan confirmation in chapter 11 bankruptcy cases.  Bankruptcy is not a prerequisite and students who take this course will still be eligible to take any of the bankruptcy courses offered at WUSTL.  Attendance, preparation, and class participation will be required. The final grade on this course will be a on a modified pass/fail basis (HP94, P, LP78, F70) and will be based on a take-home written examination (and class attendance, preparation, and participation may be taken into consideration). The take-home final will be distributed on Fri, Jan. 15, and will be due by 12:00 noon on Tuesday, January 19. While there are no prerequisites for this course, students without some background in corporate or business issues may be at a disadvantage. 1 unit.
Days/times:  M, Jan 11 – F, Jan 15:  9:00a-11:30a
Professors:  Mark Prager [view profile] and Jill Murch [view profile]
Course website: [view] (MyLaw-password required)

INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE CORPORATE LAW

 

W74-627A, section 01
The world’s leading economies are intertwined in various ways and multinational enterprises and cross-border commercial transactions are among the main connecting factors. The course deals with these phenomena from a legal perspective. It provides for a foundation essential for business lawyers who will frequently be confronted with cross-border corporate structures and transactions. The course focuses on the general characteristics of corporate law from a European and US comparative perspective. Essential features of corporations such as the decision making process and capital requirements will be discussed. In addition, attention will be paid to the ‘dynamics’ of corporate life, i.e. cross-border activities such as transfer of the corporate seat, establishment of branches and subsidiaries, takeovers and mergers. Class discussion will focus on these topics but also on general trends in the development of corporate law, for example the development of group law.  Attendance, preparation, and class participation will be required. The final grade on this course will be a on a modified pass/fail basis (HP94, P, LP78, F70) and will be based on a take-home written examination (and class attendance, preparation, and participation may be taken into consideration). The take-home final will be distributed on Fri, Jan. 15, and will be due at 12:00 noon on Tuesday, January 19. While there are no prerequisites for this course, students without some background in corporate or business issues will be at a disadvantage. 1 unit.
Days/times:  M, Jan 11 – F, Jan 15:  9:00a-11:30a
Professor:  Adriaan Dorresteijn, Utrecht University (Netherlands) [view profile
Course website: [view] (MyLaw-password required)

INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH LAW

 

W74-707H, section 01
This course will introduce students to the legal issues involved in the delivery and financing of health care in the United States.  The course is designed to help students identify and analyze legal issues in health care transactions. After a brief overview of the current health care delivery system, this course will cover selected topics including federal anti-kickback, Stark and false claims rules; legal issues in the provider-patient relationship; and federal regulation of insurers and health plans under COBRA and ERISA.  The course will conclude with practical tips for representing health care providers and organizations. There are no prerequisites for this course.  Attendance, preparation and class participation will be required.  The final grade in this course will be on a modified pass/fail basis (HP94, P, LP78, F70) and will be based on a take home written examination, class attendance, preparation, and participation.  The take-home final will be distributed on Friday, January 15 and will be due by 12:00 noon on Tuesday, January 19, 2010. 1 unit.
Days/times:  M, Jan 11 – F, Jan 15:  9:00a-11:30a
Professor:  Lisa Braun, General Counsel’s Office, Washington University [view profile]
Course website: [view] (MyLaw-password required)

IINTRODUCTION TO LAW FIRM PRACTICE 

 

W74-561E, section 01
Most law school graduates enter private practice.  This course attempts to prepare them for some of the daily challenges they will encounter in such a setting, including developing business, working on matters, billing, and dealing with co-workers and clients.  Teaching methods will include role play and other creative techniques.  Grading will be modified pass/fail (HP94, P, LP78, F70) and based on participation and a reflective journal which will be due by 12:00 noon on Tuesday, Jan uary 19, 2010.  Grading for this course will not be anonymous. 1 unit.
Days/times:  M, Jan 11 – F, Jan 15:  9:00a-11:30a
Professor:  Michael Downey [view profile]
Course website: [view] (MyLaw-password required)

LAW AND POLITICS AND M&A IN JAPAN

 

W74-670B, section 01
It is a striking fact that, despite corporation and securities laws that are broadly similar to those of the US and Europe, a hostile takeover has not yet succeeded in Japan.  It defies the notion that plugging the “right” rules into a given system or environment will everywhere lead to the same “good” results.  This course will look at a series of most prominent and controversial takeover attempts in Japan over the past decade, many of them launched by foreigners, and consider the legal, political, business and cultural factors that ultimately led to defeat and failure.  Reading will consist of case studies that focus on the business dynamics and rationales for the attempted takeovers, the legal strategies adopted, as well as the outcomes and reasoning of litigation and judicial decisions that the contests generated.  The final grade on this course will be on a modified pass/fail basis (HP94, P, LP78, F70) and will be based on a take-home written examination (and class attendance, preparation, and participation may be taken into consideration). The take-home final will be distributed on Friday, January 15, and will be due by 12:00 noon on Tuesday, January 19. 1 unit.
Days/times:  M, Jan 11 – F, Jan 15:  9:00a-11:30a
Professor: Stephen Givens, Aoyama Gakuin University (Tokyo) [view profile]
Course website: [view] (MyLaw-password required)

MEDIA AND WARTIME PROPAGANDA

 

W74-528F, section 01
This course will examine the deliberate spread of information, ideas, or rumors intended to influence public perceptions of World War II, the Vietnam War, and the War on Terror. Students will conduct analyses of broadcast and print news stories, posters, cartoons (e.g., Doonesbury, The Boondocks, Superman, Popeye), pamphlets, movie excerpts, video games, blogs, text messages, and music intended to garner public support for United States war efforts, or animus towards opponents. Our inquiry will take place in conjunction with analysis of the War Powers Act, the USA Patriot Act, select Executive Orders, First Amendment provisions, as well as case law interpreting those provisions. Out of this analysis students will learn about the scope of presidential and governmental powers as they relate to authority over mass communication and media, messaging through the deployment of governmental agents, private actors’ role in war propaganda, and restrictions upon communications in times of war. Our legal and media analyses will also surface critical questions regarding journalism and ethics (e.g., the use of “embedded” journalists), as well as race, gender, and enemy representation by public and private media agents. Your final grade will be on a modified pass/fail basis (HP94, P, LP78, F70) and will be contingent upon class attendance, participation and a take-home final examination. The take-home final will be distributed on Friday, January 15, and will be due by 12:00 noon on Tuesday, January 19. 1 unit.
Days/times:  M, Jan 11 – F, Jan 15:  9:00a-11:30a
Professor: Bryan Adamson [view profile
Course website: [view] (MyLaw-password required)

NEGOTIATION

 

W74-578G, section 01
[Students who have taken Mediation & ADR Theory & Practice, Negotiation Theory & Practice, or Business Negotiation Theory & Practice are not eligible to take this course, and students may not take this course in the same semester as the aforementioned courses. However, students who take Negotiation are eligible to take Mediation & ADR Theory & Practice, Negotiation Theory & Practice, or Business Negotiation Theory & Practice in a future semester, including the regular Spring 2010 semester.]  Enrollment limit: 60 students (50 law students + 10 non-law students). This one unit pass/fail course will emphasize learning the skills of negotiation by simulations in which students will negotiate and watch their classmates negotiate. Some negotiations will be videotaped for review in class.  Students will also be exposed to some of the basics of negotiation theory across a range of topics in negotiation, including distributive versus integrative bargaining, negotiation and power, and the psychology of negotiation.  The readings for the course consist of Roger Fisher and William Ury, Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Harvard/Belknap Paperback) and other selected readings on negotiation that will be available via the course website prior to the beginning of the winter break.  In addition to the simulations and discussion of the readings, there will be brief instruction on drafting agreements and advice about further steps to improve negotiation skills.  Students who attend all class sessions, participate in good faith in the simulations, and do the readings will receive a pass for the course.  (A passing grade will show on a student’s record as "CR", which stands for "Credit"; a student who does not pass the course risks receiving an F70, which would affect a law student's GPA.)  Attendance will be taken each day. Enrollment limit: 60 [50 Law Students + 10 Non-Law Students]. 1 unit.
Days/times:  M, Jan 11 – F, Jan 15:  9:00a-11:30a
Professor: C.J. Larkin, Washington University Law [view profile]
Course website: [view] (MyLaw-password required)

PROBLEMS IN CORPORATE LAW

 

W74-626C, section 01
This course is divided into three parts.  Part One will explore the question of who should make corporate law.  Specifically, we will discuss scholarly theories addressing whether the states or the federal government are better positioned to regulate internal corporate affairs and explaining Delaware’s prominence in corporate law.  Part Two will briefly examine Delaware statutory and common law of corporations.  We will then consider the inner workings of expedited and summary litigation, problems in the organization and functioning of a corporation (focusing on management and control), and mergers and transfers of control (including hostile acquisitions, tender offers, going private transactions, and defensive tactics).  Finally, Part Three provides hands-on experience in litigating corporate cases.  Students will participate in two oral arguments as advocates and judges.  The final grade on this course will be on a modified pass/fail basis (HP94, P, LP78, F70) and based on a take-home written examination. The take-home final will be distributed on Friday, January 15, and will be due by 12:00 noon on Tuesday, January 19. Class attendance and participation are mandatory. While there are no prerequisites for this course, students without some background in corporate or business issues may be at a disadvantage. 1 unit.
Days/times:  M, Jan 11 – F, Jan 15:  9:00a-11:30a
Professor:  Chancellor William Chandler [view profile]
Course website: [view] (MyLaw-password required)

 

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