2009 Intersession Course Directory and Registration

Courses will be held January 5-9, 2009 (except for Negotiation - see course descriptions below).  Listed below are those courses being offered for the 2009 intersession. Note: Feminist Legal Perspectives has been cancelled.

Registration

Students will be notified by email of the course they get into (and any they are waitlisted for, if applicable) prior to online registration for spring semester courses in mid-November.  The 1 unit for the January Intersession class counts as part of the total number of units for the spring semester and there is no additional charge for law students in full-time degree programs. (Tuition is likely waived also for non-law full-time students in degree programs, depending on the particular department - please check with your department if you aren't sure.) Waitlists are kept by hand in the Registrar’s Office so that students can be on a number of waitlists without it affecting their 18 total unit maximum for the spring semester. Note that students who submitted only one choice during the online pre-registration period do not have an advantage over students who rank ordered a number of choices. The drop deadline for the January Intersession courses is Mon, Dec. 1.  Students should drop via WebSTAC up through Dec. 1 (after that, they should contact Colleen Erker to request permission to drop after the deadline). Students can take only one intersession course at a time.

Questions? Contact Colleen Erker at erker@wustl.edu, or 314-935-6466.

Course Directory

Chapter 11 Strategies for the Business Lawyer

Course Number: W74-645F - 1 unit
Professors:  Professor Mark Prager [view profile] and
Professor Jill Murch [view profile]
Course Schedule: M-F 9:00 am - 11:30 am
Drop deadline:  Mon, Dec. 1 

Course Description: This course will provide the foundation essential for any business lawyer in today's corporate world where chapter 11 "mega" cases frequently intersect with corporate and litigation matters.  Class discussion will be based on a hypothetical problem modeled after current bankruptcy cases, and students will have the opportunity to learn chapter 11 strategies from the perspective of secured and unsecured creditors, indenture trustees, venture capital, equity holders, and the corporate debtor. This class will cover the essential elements of corporate bankruptcies ranging from the automatic stay, fraudulent transfers, and preferences through plan confirmation in chapter 11 bankruptcy cases.  Bankruptcy is not a prerequisite and students who take this course will still be eligible to take any of the bankruptcy courses offered at WUSTL.  Attendance, preparation, and class participation will be required. The final grade on this course will be a on a modified pass/fail basis (HP94, P, LP78, F70) and will be based on a take-home written examination (and class attendance, preparation, and participation may be taken into consideration). The take-home final will be distributed on Fri, Jan. 9, and will be due at 9:00am on Mon, Jan. 12. While there are no prerequisites for this course, students without some background in corporate or business issues may be at a disadvantage.

Comparative Property and Tax Law: 
Select Topics, Chile and United States

Course Number: W74-535F - 1 unit
Professor:  Professor Hugo Hurtado [view profile] and
Professor Kelly Moore [view profile]
Course Schedule:  M-F 9:00 am - 11:30 am
Drop deadline:  Mon, Dec. 1

Course Description:  This course explores the similarities and differences between Chilean and United States gratuitous property transfer law and related tax issues, including topics related to corporate and trust taxation.  The course will discuss the underlying policies of each country's tax and property law, discussing how policy differences are reflected in the tax codes.  There are no prerequisites for this course.  Students intending to take a course in estate and gift taxation may find this course a helpful introduction to the topic. This course will offer an introduction to comparative analysis for any student interested in estate planning issues in the international context. Attendance, preparation, and class participation will be required. The final grade on this course will be on a pass/fail basis and will be based on a take-home written examination (and class attendance, preparation, and participation may be taken into consideration). The take-home final will be distributed on Fri, Jan. 9, and will be due at 9:00am on Mon, Jan. 12. (A passing grade will show on a student’s record as "CR", which stands for "Credit"; a student who does not pass the course risks receiving an F70, which would affect a law student's GPA.)  [Students in the Tax LLM program are eligible to take this course.] 

Feminist Legal Perspectives

Course Number: W74-602E - 1 unit
Professor:  Professor Brenda Cossman [view profile]

This course has been cancelled. 

Housing Law

Course Number: W74-551D - 1 unit
Professor:  Professor Sharon Geno [view profile]
Course Schedule: M-F 9:00am - 11:30 am
Course Description: This course will serve as an overview of housing law and policy including the role of federal law, the court system, and local housing programs.  The course will cover federal housing subsidy programs, state and local housing programs, the private market, and housing rights and remedies.  All of these will be considered in light of recent changes to the housing market and regulatory supervision and control.  Attendance, preparation, and class participation will be required. The final grade on this course will be on a pass/fail basis (A passing grade will show on students' records as "CR", which stands for "Credit"; a student who does not pass the course risks receiving an F70, which would affect a law student's GPA.) and based on a take-home written examination. The take-home final will be distributed on Fri, Jan. 9, and will be due at 9:00am on Mon, Jan. 12. Drop deadline:  Mon, Dec. 1.  1 unit.

Introduction to Intellectual Property Law

Course Number: W74-647J - 1 unit
Professor:  Professor David Deal [view profile]
Course Schedule:   M-F 9:00 am - 11:30 am
Drop deadline:  Mon, Dec. 1

Course Description: This introduction to intellectual property course combines an overview of patents, trademarks, and copyrights with a focus on early stage issue recognition, planning and response. Students will learn the constitutional and statutory foundations as well as the public policy behind each of the types of intellectual property.  In addition, the course will focus on issues pertaining to the acquisition, exploitation, and enforcement of patents, trademarks, and copyrights.  Instruction will include lecture, case studies, simulations and practical problems. There are no prerequisites for this course and students who take this course will still be eligible to take any of the intellectual property courses offered at WUSTL.  Attendance, preparation, and class participation will be required. The final grade on this course will be on a pass/fail basis and will be based on a take-home written examination (and class attendance, preparation, and participation may be taken into consideration). The take-home final will be distributed on Fri, Jan. 9, and will be due at 9:00am on Mon, Jan. 12. (A passing grade will show on a student’s record as "CR", which stands for "Credit"; a law student who does not pass the course risks receiving an F70, which would affect a law student's GPA.)  [Students who have taken IP Law & Practice in the summer school session are not eligible to take this course.] 

Introduction to Law Firm Practice

Course Number: W74-561E - 1 unit
Professor:  Professor Michael Downey [view profile]
Course Schedule:  M-F 9:00 am - 11:30 am
Drop deadline:  Mon, Dec. 1

Course Description:  Most law school graduates enter private practice.  This course attempts to prepare them for some of the daily challenges they will encounter in such a setting, including developing business, working on matters, billing, and dealing with co-workers and clients.  Teaching methods will include role play and other creative techniques.  Grading will be modified pass/fail (HP94, P, LP78, F70) and based on participation and a reflective journal.  Grading for this course will not be anonymous.

Law and the Practice of International Diplomacy

Course Number: W74-619D - 1 unit
Professor:  Professor Thomas Schweich [view profile]
Course Schedule:   M-F 9:00 am - 11:30 am
Drop deadline: Mon, Dec. 1

Course Description:  This course will teach students how to pursue a diplomatic career (civil service, foreign service, political appointment); how the U.S. Department of State is organized; basic diplomatic skills (including conducting diplomatic meetings, writing decision memos and briefing memos, drafting cables, making oral statements at international conferences, and preparing for congressional testimony); basic diplomatic etiquette; communications among U.S. inter-agency groups; and communications to foreign governments.  The course will place particular emphasis on the role that lawyers play in diplomatic initiatives.  Students will participate in a workshop that will give them experience in drafting diplomatic documents; the workshop will be related to the crisis in Sudan and the International Criminal Court.  Attendance, preparation, and class participation will be required. The final grade on this course will be a on a modified pass/fail basis (HP94, P, LP78, F70) and will be based on a take-home written examination (and class attendance, preparation, and participation may be taken into consideration). The take-home final will be distributed on Fri, Jan. 9, and will be due at 9:00am on Mon, Jan. 12

Negotiation

Course Number: W74-578G - 1 unit
Enrollment limit: 50 law + 10 non-law graduate students. 
Professors:  Dean Kent Syverud [view profile] and
Professor Rebecca Hollander-Blumoff [view profile]
Professor Annette Appel [view profile]
Course Schedule:   M-W 9:00am - 1:30pm
Drop deadline:  Mon, Dec. 1

Course Description:  [Students who have taken Mediation & ADR Theory & Practice, Negotiation Theory & Practice, or Business Negotiation Theory & Practice are not eligible to take this course, and students may not take this course in the same semester as the aforementioned courses. However, students who take Negotiation are eligible to take Mediation & ADR Theory & Practice, Negotiation Theory & Practice, or Business Negotiation Theory & Practice in a future semester.]

This one unit pass/fail course will be offered in an intensive three day format. The course will emphasize learning the skills of negotiation by simulations in which students will negotiate and watch their classmates negotiate. Some negotiations will be videotaped for review in class.  Students will also be exposed to some of the basics of negotiation theory across a range of topics in negotiation, including distributive versus integrative bargaining, negotiation and power, and the psychology of negotiation.  The readings for the course consist of Roger Fisher and William Ury, Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Harvard/Belknap Paperback) and other selected readings on negotiation that will be available via the course website prior to the beginning of the winter break.  In addition to the simulations and discussion of the readings, there will be brief instruction on drafting agreements and advice about further steps to improve negotiation skills.  Students who attend all class sessions, participate in good faith in the simulations, and do the readings will receive a pass for the course.  (A passing grade will show on a student’s record as "CR", which stands for "Credit"; a student who does not pass the course risks receiving an F70, which would affect a law student's GPA.)  Attendance will be taken each day. 

Transnational Migration and Citizenship Law

Course Number: W74-630A - 1 unit
Professors:  Goncalo Matias [view profile]
Course Schedule: M-F 9:00 am - 11:30 am
Drop deadline:  Mon, Dec. 1

Course Description: This course aims to provide an overview of the relationship between transnational migration and citizenship regulations in a globalized world.  The course will cover the policy and legal aspects of transnational migration and citizenship. It will also cover the international rules applying to migrants and their national application and scrutiny. Particular attention will be devoted to the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families as an important international instrument to regulate transnational migration and migrants´ rights.  The situation of the undocumented migrants will be analyzed paying particular attention to the rights protected by international law.  The evolution of transnational migration created great challenges to the set ideas on citizenship. Migrants aspire to be citizens and this aspiration confronts the well established rules on states´ sovereignty over citizenship. Examples of transnational citizenship and European citizenship will illustrate the denationalization of citizenship.  Students will be encouraged to discuss the set ideas on citizenship as the exclusive domestic jurisdiction and its relation with globalization and transnational migration.  Attendance, preparation, and class participation will be required. The final grade on this course will be a on a modified pass/fail basis (HP94, P, LP78, F70) and will be based on a take-home written examination (and class attendance, preparation, and participation may be taken into consideration). The take-home final will be distributed on Fri, Jan. 9, and will be due at 9:00am on Mon, Jan. 12.  

This page last updated 3 November 2008.