Office of the Law School Registrar
Course Directory

Summer Session 2001

Historical information is available for Spring 1999,
Summer 1999, Fall 1999, Spring 2000
, Summer 2000, Fall 2000


Summer courses are open to all matriculated Washington University law students and non-Washington University law students currently in good standing at their law school. Students from other law schools must present a letter of good standing from their law school. Pending permission of the professor and the School of Law Registrar, School of Law classes are open to individuals possessing an undergraduate degree from a U.S. college or university; however, credits earned cannot be applied de facto toward a W.U. School of Law degree. Non-law students who are not enrolled in a graduate program at W.U. must present a copy of their undergraduate transcript or diploma.

Law students may take a maximum of 7 credit hours in the summer session and earn up to one-third of a semester residency credit.

REGISTRATION

Open registration for summer classes begins immediately. Registration forms are available from the "Student Forms and Information" hanging files to the far left of the student mailboxes or on the web at http://law.wustl.edu/Registrar/Forms/. Completed forms should be returned to the counter in Room 303, the School of Law Registrar's Office, which is open Monday through Friday (9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon and 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.). Students may also mail or fax their Registration forms to: Office of the Registrar, Washington University School of Law, One Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1120, St. Louis, MO 63130; Fax: 314-935-6959. On-line registration is not available for summer school. To register with priority for an externship (see descriptions), students should submit a "Summer Judicial Clerkship and Lawyering Practice Externship Pre-Registration" form by Friday, April 6. These forms are also available by the student mailboxes and on the web and should be turned in to the box on the counter in Room 303 faxed, or mailed. Registration questions may be directed to Barb Laudel, bjlaudel@wulaw.wustl.edu, 314-935-7458 or Sue Halvorson, halvorss@wulaw.wustl.edu, 314-935-4750.

SEMESTER INFORMATION

Classes begin Monday, May 21, 2001 and end Friday, June 22, 2001.

During the week beginning May 28 (Memorial Day), classes with Monday meetings will meet Tuesday through Friday, unless the professor makes other arrangements for the class.

TENTATIVE EXAMINATION SCHEDULE

  • Alternative Dispute Resolution: Monday, June 25, 10:30 a.m.
  • Trusts & Estates: Tuesday, June 26, 4:00 p.m.
  • Law and Religion in a Democratic Society
    take-home exam due June 21
  • Telecommunications Law: Papers and an oral presentation

TUITION

Tuition for the summer session is $775 per credit hour. Tuition payment is due by the first day of class. Late fees will be charged on a daily basis beginning June 1, 2001. Any students who have not paid tuition by June 21, 2001, will not be permitted to examine in or receive credit for their course.

Courses

ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION                      Westbrook

W74-641L (3 hrs.)
M-Tu-W-Th
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Enrollment Limit: 24

The course is designed to help students understand the nature and advantages and disadvantages of alternative methods of preventing and resolving disputes so that, as lawyers or other professionals, they can help their clients and other individuals and institutions select and take part in these alternative processes. We will explore interviewing and counseling, negotiation, mediation, arbitration, and various "mixed processes" such as summary jury trials and mini-trials.

Students will be expected to participate in some role-play exercises unless specifically excused.

Grades will be based on a personal journal related to one of the role-play exercises and a final examination.

LAW AND RELIGION IN A DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY     Blumoff

W74-724B (3 hrs.)
M-Tu-W-Th
8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Enrollment Limit: 30

Nearly four hundred years ago, John Winthrop, the founding Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, described the paramount objective of the new Colony as the creation of "a due form of government," at once both sectarian and secular. The "New" England experiment in mixed government began to end almost as soon as it started, and the proper role of religion in a democratic society has engendered (often fierce) debate ever since. This course will outline the history of that debate, and examine some of the normative sources that continue to influence its unfolding. Those sources include the norms derived from theology, political theory, psychology, sociology, and, of course, law.

The course begins with an unanswered and perhaps unanswerable question: What is religion? The impossibility of determining once and for all-for believers and non-believers-what religion is suggests one of the themes on the course: The difficulty of describing its place in a radically pluralistic democratic society. With an eye on theory throughout the course, we'll look at both the policy and legal debates surrounding some of the major issues involved in contemporary First Amendment jurisprudence, including prayer in public schools, public aid to parochial schools generally, school choice, and accommodation. The course will end with a take home exam due the last day of class.

Course also open to non-law graduate students.

TELECOMMUNICATIONS LAW                                          Johnson

W75-501C (3 hrs.)
Tu 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Th 6:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
F 12:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

This course will review current events in telecommunications and the impact of regulatory and technological developments in building the information super-highway.

The goals of the course are 1) to have a basic understanding of the current issues in telecommunications and new technological innovations; 2) to develop a practical context and analytical framework for understanding the interdisciplinary issues in telecommunications; and 3) to learn how to use technology to access current resources.

Students will become familiar with the technology including broadcast, cable, telephony, the Internet, and new technology systems. Particular focus will be given to the Telecommunications Act of 1996 and its effectiveness in encouraging innovation and competition. Students will not only study the industry, but also use the technology as an integral part of the class. Students will engage in role-playing and simulations using teleconferencing, video conferencing, and the Internet. There will be guest lecturers who will talk about selected topics in the industry. Students will have a final 20 page paper and 4 short 1-3 page papers that will comprise their grade. They will also be graded on an oral presentation. There is no final exam.

TRUSTS & ESTATES                                                                  Wolf

W74-575M (3 hrs.)
M-Tu-W-Th
4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

The Trusts and Estates course will examine the basic legal doctrines governing distribution of wealth on death. After an introduction to the probate process and general estate planning principles, the class will examine intestate succession, including the shares allocated to various relatives, transfers to children (including posthumous, adopted, and nonmarital children), and bars to succession, such as homicide and disclaimer. Next, wills will be covered in detail, including testamentary capacity and contests, will formalities and forms, revocation, will components, and contracts to make wills. Issues relating to will construction will be addressed, including changes in beneficiaries and property subsequent to will execution. Special doctrines to protect family members, especially surviving spouses, will be examined. The second half of the course will focus on will substitutes, with a brief look at contractual payable-on-death provisions, multiple party bank accounts, and joint tenancies, but with primary emphasis on trusts. Trust topics will include the creation of trusts, revocable trusts, pour-over wills, charitable trusts, discretionary and spendthrift trusts, creditors' rights, as well modification and termination of trusts and the use of powers of appointment. Trust administration and the fiduciary duties, rights, and liabilities of trustees will be examined. Finally, the class will address planning for incapacity and death. Emphasis will be on the Uniform Probate Code, with additional references to Missouri law.

Several drafting exercises will be required in addition to a limited open-book final exam.

Regular, punctual class attendance and active participation are required. Failure to comply with this requirement may result in a reduction of the final grade.

EXTERNSHIPS

Special deadlines apply for the courses listed below. Students must submit the Summer Judicial Clerkship and Lawyering Practice Externship Pre-registration Form (found in the "Student Forms & Information" hanging files near the student mailboxes) to the Registrar's Office, room 303, by Friday, April 6 to register with priority. These deadlines are necessitated by special circumstances surrounding requirements of placement sites, along with the goal of continuing excellent relationships between WUSL and the judges/attorneys who supervise our students. After April 6, interested students may still be able to be placed in a summer externship, but each student will be handled on a case by case basis by Professor Bobinette. Lawyering Practice Externship placements will be handled by Professor Bobinette on an individual basis, while Judicial Clerkship placements will be arranged on the schedule specified below.

NOTE: Clinical opportunities, including Judicial Clerkship, which are offered during the academic year have enrollment limits, often with waiting lists for second-year law students or third years who have already had a clinic.

JUDICIAL CLERKSHIP EXTERNSHIP                           Bobinette

W74-654 (3 or 4 credit hours)
Days and Times to be arranged.

Enrollment limited: 12 Students who will not have completed a) at least 12 credits of upper level law courses and b) a course in legal ethics by the beginning of the clerkship should speak with either Prof. Bobinette (621-9550) or Prof. Karen Tokarz, Director of Clinical Education (935-6414, Room 584), for permission to enroll in this externship.

Pre-registration: Submit form for pre-registration by Friday, April 6, 2001. Open registration continues, based on placement availablility. Professor Bobinette will work with interested students on an individual basis. There will be a group orientation meeting on Monday, April 9 (4:00 p.m., Room 306). Placement preference forms will be distributed to students by the Clinical Office and are due back to the Clinical Office, room 589, on Tuesday, April 10. Placements will be assigned by Professor Bobinette to students thereafter. Students will have the opportunity to accept/reject their placement site within one day of receiving notification of their placement. If a placement is accepted, the student may not drop and will receive a grade of pass or fail. Please direct questions about placement sites to Professor Bobinette at 621-9550, or the clinical staff in room 589, at 935-5599 or 935-6419.

Students in this externship learn advocacy and litigation skills working as part-time law clerks with state and federal trial appellate judges in Missouri and Illinois. Students observe civil and criminal litigation from the judicial perspective. Students develop advanced legal research and writing skills through drafting legal memoranda relevant to cases pending before the courts. This course will be graded on a pass / fail basis. Students in this course must work a minimum of 168 hours for 3 credits or 224 hours for 4 credits over a period of six to ten weeks. Students are strongly encouraged to spread the work out over a ten-week period. Students may begin work before the beginning of regular summer school courses through arrangement with the instructor.

WITHDRAWAL POLICY: In the interest of maintaining excellent relationships with our placement sites, once students have accepted placement, they may not drop this course, and will receive a grade of pass or fail (65).

LAWYERING PRACTICE EXTERNSHIPS Bobinette

W74-798A (4 hrs)
Days and Times to be arranged.

Enrollment limit: 12 Students who have not completed a course in legal ethics by the beginning of the externship should speak with either Prof. Bobinette (621-9550) or Prof. Karen Tokarz, Director of Clinical Education (935-6414, Room 584) for permission to enroll. Also, particular prerequisites may apply depending upon the externship. Students should speak directly with Professor Bobinette or Professor Tokarz regarding required experience or pre-requisites as they vary according to the externship.

Pre-registration: Submit form for pre-registration by Friday, April 6, 2001. Open registration continues, based on placement availability. Professor Bobinette will work with interested students on an individual basis. There will be a group orientation meeting on Monday, April 9 (4:30 p.m., Room 306). Once a student accepts his or her placement, the student may not drop the course. A student who accepts a placement will receive a grade of pass or fail.

Students in various lawyering practice externships learn advocacy and litigation skills working in off-campus law offices under the supervision of clinical field supervisors. Students may handle cases in civil or criminal matters and have the opportunity to work in public or private offices. Students engage in various phases of lawyering practice, including interviewing, counseling, investigation, drafting, negotiation, and settlement. Students who are Rule 13 certified may participate in legal hearings, motions, trials, and appeals. Rule 13 applications can be picked up in the Student Forms and Information area near the student mailboxes. To be eligible for Rule 13 certification, students must have completed at least 42 credits.

Students may work at Legal Services of Eastern Missouri (and possibly other public interest offices handling landlord/tenant, consumer, domestic relations, government benefits, education, and mental health cases); in the Public Defender's Office, working in the misdemeanor, juvenile, or felony units; in the criminal and civil divisions of the U.S. Attorney's Office for the E.D. Mo. in St. Louis; or in the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission district office in St. Louis. This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.

NOTE: Students interested in working at the U.S. Attorney's Office must submit F.B.I. clearance paperwork to the U.S. Attorney's Office by the end of March (check with Jan Bender, 539-7624, at the U.S. Attorney's Office to verify exact date and find out about other details). Students interested in working at Legal Services of Eastern Missouri or the Public Defender's office should ideally be Rule 13 certified. Rule 13 certification is also recommended for placement at the E.E.O.C. Rule 13 applications can be picked up by the student mailboxes. To be eligible for Rule 13 certification, students must have completed at least 42 credits.

Students in this course must work a minimum of 224 hours over a period of six to ten weeks. Students are strongly encouraged to spread the work out over a ten week period. Students may begin work before the beginning of regular summer school courses through arrangement with the instructor.

WITHDRAWAL POLICY: In the interest of maintaining excellent relationships with our placement sites, once students have accepted placement, they may not drop this course, and will receive a grade of pass or fail (65).