Office of the Law School Registrar:
Course Directory

Summer Semester 2000
General Information


Summer courses are open to all matriculated Washington University law students and non-Washington University law students currently in good standing at an ABA accredited law school.

Students from other ABA accredited law schools may register for summer courses upon presentation of a letter of good standing from their Dean and written permission to take courses here for transfer credit.

Law students may take a maximum of 7 credit hours in the summer session and earn up to one-third of a semester residency credit.

REGISTRATION

Open registration for summer classes begins immediatelyRegistration forms are available from the A"Student Forms and Information" hanging files to the far left of the student mailboxes.  Completed forms should be returned to the counter in Room 303, the Law School Registrar's Office, which is open Monday through Friday (9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon and 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.).  On-line registration is not available for summer school. 

COURSE INFORMATION

Classes begin Monday, May 22, 2000 and end Thursday, June 22, 2000.

Classes will meet Monday through Thursday.  During the week beginning May 29 (Memorial Day), classes will meet Tuesday through Friday, unless the professor makes other arrangements for the class.

TENTATIVE EXAMINATION SCHEDULE

Alternative Dispute Resolution:  Monday, June 26, time TBA
Juvenile Justice (possible exam):  Tuesday, June 27, time TBA
First Amendment:  Wednesday, June 28, time TBA
Other courses do not have final examinations.

TUITION

Tuition for the summer session is $725 per credit hour.

Tuition payment is due by the first day of class.  Late fees will be charged on a daily basis beginning June 1, 2000.

Any students who have not paid tuition by June 22, 2000, will not be permitted to examine in or receive credit for their course.



SUMMER SESSION 2000 Course Descriptions

ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION                                                                         Moore

W74-641K sec 1                                                                                                                      (3 hrs.)
M-TU-W-TH
8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

This course will explore non-judicial avenues of dispute resolution such as negotiation, mediation, arbitration and hybrid forms, with particular focus on the advocacy role of lawyers in mediation and arbitration.  The course will employ various visual aids; negotiating games; mediation exercises, roleplays and simulations to provide students with an understanding of the characteristics of these dispute resolution processes; development of basic ADR skills and a vehicle for examining ethical problems, practical limitations and the emerging law in the field.  Limited enrollment of 24.  There will be a final examination on Monday, June 26, time TBA.

NOTE: Although Alternative Dispute Resolution will be offered again during the 2000-2001 academic year, this limited enrollment course historically has had long waiting lists during the academic year.

Faculty Biography:  Professor Loretta W. Moore joined the faculty at Washburn University School of Law in the fall of 1991.  She received her J.D. from Washington University School of Law in 1978.  She holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Business Administration and Economics from Park College in Missouri.  At Washburn, Professor Moore teaches in the Law Clinic, where she supervises legal interns in pretrial and litigation proceedings involving debtor/creditor, consumer, and Chapter 7 bankruptcy cases.  She also supervises an Alternative Dispute Resolution Clinic, which provides a practicum for eligible students to mediate and/or arbitrate actual disputes.  Professor Moore has taught ADR, Mediation, Advocacy Skills in Mediation and Negotiation, Sports Law, and LR&W.  Several Negotiation Competition teams, for which she is an advisor, have represented Washburn at the national competition, with one team ranking third nationally.  From 1998-91, Professor Moore was an adjunct pretrial professor at Washington University School of Law.

FIRST AMENDMENT                                                                                                 Bodensteiner

W74-604B sec 1                                                                                                                      (3 hrs.)
M-TU-W-TH
6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
This course examines the Supreme Court=s approach to freedom of speech, addressing why and how government restricts speech, as well as rights ancillary to freedom of speech, such as freedom of association and freedom of the press.  In addition, the course reviews the Court's analysis of religious freedom issues raised in cases under the free exercise and establishment clauses of the first amendment.  There will be a final examination on Wednesday, June 28, time TBA.  Class participation is not graded but if a student who is called on in class is either absent (without prior notice) or not prepared, points may be deducted from the exam score.

NOTE:  This course will not be offered during the 2000-2001 academic year.

Faculty Biography:  Professor Ivan E. Bodensteiner currently teaches at Valparaiso University School of Law, where he was Dean from 1985-90.  His specialties are Civil Procedure, Civil Rights, Evidence, Constitutional Law, and Trial Practice.  His long list of publications includes several articles on civil rights and civil liberties.  His daughter, Jill Bodensteiner, is a Washington University School of Law graduate of the class of 1994, who currently is the Assistant Vice President & Counsel in the Office of the General Counsel at the University of Notre Dame.  Together with his other daughter, Julie, Professor Bodensteiner litigates civil rights/constitutional cases, including first amendment cases (often involving public employees).  They are currently litigating one case involving allegations of excessive force by the police in making an arrest and another involving allegations of race discrimination by school district in demoting a psychologist working in special education.

JUVENILE JUSTICE                                                                                                           Gardner

W74-556A sec 1
                                                                                                                      (3 hrs.)
M-TU-W-TH
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

An investigation of the law relating to young people with primary emphasis on the juvenile justice system in both its delinquency and status offense manifestations.  Some attention will also be directed to consideration of juveniles' constitutional rights in general as well as to an examination of selected private law areas pertaining to minors.  The grade will be based on a paper or a final exam (which would take place on Tuesday, June 27, time TBA), and the professor will announce at the beginning of the course which one will be required.

NOTE:  This course will not be offered during the 2000-2001 academic year.  This course complements but does not duplicate Children & the Law, regularly offered during the academic year, and students can receive credit for both.

Faculty Biography:  Martin R. Gardner is the Steinhart Foundation Professor of Law at University of Nebraska College of Law, where his specialties include Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Corrections, Family Law, Juvenile Law, Commercial Law, Remedies, The Criminal Sanction (seminar), Sports Law (seminar), Legal Writing, and Moot Court.  He won the Law College Distinguished Teaching Award in 1998.  He taught at Washington University School of Law in the summer of 1983.  His publications include books on juvenile law and criminal law, as well as many articles on specific topics in those areas.


SPORTS LAW                                                                                                                        Yasser

W74-510B sec 1                                                                                                                      (3 hrs.)
M-TU-W-TH
4:00 p.m. - 6 p.m.

This course surveys issues related to amateur and professional sports.  The amateur sports law topics include:

(1)     Introduction to amateurism;

(2)     Amateur sports organizations and state action;

(3)     The nature of the right to participate;

(4)     Sexual discrimination in amateur athletics;

(5)     Amateur sports organizations and the antitrust laws.

The professional sports law topics include:

(1)     The player - club contractual relationship;

(2)     The player - agent relationship;

(3)     Antitrust and labor law issues in professional team sports;

(4)     Arbitration;

(5)     Relationships of teams in a league;

(6)     The fledgling league versus the established league;

(7)     Stadium and arena issues.

Issues related to tort and criminal liability for sports activities are also explored.  In addition, newly burgeoning sports law areas are examined.  These include disability issues, intellectual property and international law.

There is no final examination in this class.  Students are evaluated on a variety of "practical skills" assignments which arise out of the materials.  For example, students typically negotiate a professional sports player=s contract as one such problem.  Or students might be asked to decide on the eligibility of a college basketball player with a life threatening heart ailment.  Class participation and attendance are also taken into account for grading purposes.

NOTE:  This course will not be offered during the 2000-2001 academic year.  This course complements but does not duplicate Sports & Entertainment Law Planning & Drafting, regularly offered during the academic year, and students can receive credit for both.


Faculty Biography:  Professor Raymond L. Yasser is one of the pioneers in the area of Sports Law.  His casebook, now in its fourth edition, was the first sports law casebook published in the United States, and it is widely used at law schools and sports administration graduate programs nationwide.  He has published extensively in the sports law area.  Professor Yasser is a popular teacher at the University of Tulsa College of Law, having won numerous teaching awards, including a university-wide outstanding teacher award.  Professor Yasser maintains an active sports law practice, most notably by representing players in eligibility disputes.  He has also been lead counsel in 11 Title IX (gender equity) class action cases, representing females seeking equal athletic opportunities.  He previously taught Sports Law at Washington University School of Law during the summers of 1994 and 1996.



EXTERNSHIPS

                                                          

Special deadlines apply for the courses listed below.  Students must submit the Summer Judicial Clerkship and Lawyering Practice Externship Pre-registration Form (found in the "Student Forms & Information" hanging files near the student mailboxes) to the Registrar's Office, room 303, by Wednesday, April 5 to register with priority.  These deadlines are necessitated by special circumstances surrounding requirements of placement sites, along with the goal of continuing excellent relationships between WUSL and the judges/attorneys who supervise our students.

Monday, April 5 is the deadline for pre-registering for these courses.  After this date, interested students may still be able to be placed in a summer externship; but each student will be handled on a case by case basis by Professor Bobinette.  Lawyering Practice Externship placements will be handled by Professor Bobinette on an individual basis, whereas Judicial Clerkship placements will be arranged on the schedule specified below.

NOTE:  Clinical opportunities, including Judicial Clerkship, are offered during the academic year.  Each clinic has enrollment limits, often with waiting lists.

JUDICIAL CLERKSHIP EXTERNSHIP                                                                         Bobinette

W74-654 sec 01                                                                                                   (3 or 4 credit hours)
Days and Times to be arranged.

Enrollment limited: 12    Students who will not have completed a) at least 12 credits of upper level law courses and b) a course in legal ethics by the beginning of the clerkship should speak with either Prof. Bobinette (621-9550) or Prof. Karen Tokarz, Director of Clinical Education (935-6414, Room 584) for permission to be enrolled in this externship.

Pre-registration:  Submit form for pre-registration by Wednesday, April 5, 2000.  Open registration continues, but placement may no longer be available.  Professor Bobinette will work with interested students on an individual basis.  There will be a group orientation meeting on Monday, April 10 (4:00 p.m., Room 305).  Placement preference forms will be distributed to students by the Clinical Office and are due back to the Clinical Office, room 589, on Tuesday, April 11.  Placements may be assigned to students on Thursday, April 13.  Students will be asked to accept/reject their placement site within one day of receiving notification of their placement.  If a placement is accepted, the student may not drop and will receive a grade of pass or fail.

Students in this externship learn advocacy and litigation skills working as part-time law clerks with state and federal trial appellate judges in Missouri and Illinois.  Students observe civil and criminal litigation from the judicial perspective.  Students develop advanced legal research and writing skills through drafting legal memoranda relevant to cases pending before the courts.  This course will be graded on a pass / fail basis.


Students in this course must work a minimum of 168 hours for 3 credits or 224 hours for 4 credits over a period of six to ten weeks.  Students are strongly encouraged to spread the work out over a ten-week period.  Students may begin work before the beginning of regular summer school courses through arrangement with the instructor.

WITHDRAWAL POLICY: Once students have accepted placement, they may not drop this course, and will receive a grade of pass or fail (65).

LAWYERING PRACTICE EXTERNSHIPS                                                                    Bobinette

W74-798A sec 01                                                                                                                     (4 hrs)
Days and Times to be arranged.

Enrollment limit: 12    Students who have not completed a course in legal ethics by the beginning of the clerkship should speak with either Prof. Bobinette (621-9550) or Prof. Karen Tokarz, Director of Clinical Education (935-6414, Room 584) for permission to be enrolled in this externship.  Also, particular prerequisites may apply depending upon externship.

Pre-registration:  Submit form for pre-registration by Wednesday, April 5, 2000.  Open registration continues, but placement may no longer be available.  Professor Bobinette will work with interested students on an individual basis.  Once a student accepts his or her placement, the student may not drop.  A student who accepts a placement will receive a grade of pass or fail.

Students in various lawyering practice externships learn advocacy and litigation skills working in off-campus law offices under the supervision of clinical field supervisors.  Students may handle cases in civil or criminal matters and have the opportunity to work in public or private offices.  Students engage in various phases of lawyering practice, including interviewing, counseling, investigation, drafting, negotiation, and settlement.  Third-year students may participate in legal hearings, motions, trials, and appeals.

Students may work at Legal Services of Eastern Missouri (and possibly other public interest offices handling landlord/tenant, consumer, domestic relations, government benefits, education, and mental health cases); in the Public Defender=s Office, working in the misdemeanor, juvenile, or felony units; in the criminal and civil divisions of the U.S. Attorney=s Office for the E.D. Mo. in St. Louis; or in the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission district office in St. Louis.  This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.

NOTE: Students interested in working at the U.S. Attorney's Office must submit F.B.I. clearance paperwork to the U.S. Attorney=s Office by the end of March (check with the U.S. Attorney's Office to verify exact date).  Students interested in working at Legal Services of Eastern Missouri or the Public Defender's office should ideally be registered as a student with the Missouri Bar (Rule 8) and must be Rule 13 certified.  Rule 13 certification is also recommended for placement at the E.E.O.C.


Students in this course must work a minimum of 224 over a period of six weeks.  Students are strongly encouraged to spread the work out over a six to ten week period.  Students may begin work before the beginning of regular summer school courses through arrangement with the instructor.

WITHDRAWAL POLICY: Once students have accepted placement, they may not drop this course, and will receive a grade of pass or fail (65).

Faculty Biography:  Professor Bobinette, a partner at the law firm of Uthoff, Graber, Bobinette & O'Keefe, received his law degree from St. Louis University School of Law.  He began teaching Trial Advocacy there in 1977, the same year that he began as an adjunct at Washington University School of Law.  He served as a Clinical Law Fellow at Washington University School of Law (1975-77) and as a Staff and Managing Attorney at St. Louis Legal Aid Society (1971-75).  Twice in the 1980s, he appeared before the United States Supreme Court.


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