Office of the Law School Registrar
Course Directory

Applied Lawyering Skills
Spring 2003
 
(Last update:  12/16/02)


IP

= Courses which are part of the curriculum for the LL.M. in IP & Technology Law degree E = Courses which satisfy the ethics requirement

IP Advanced Intellectual Property Litigation 

Greg Upchurch

W75 530E SEC 01                (3 hours)               TUE THU 5:00 - 6:30 PM

Enrollment limit: 24. [Enrollment is limited to LL.M. in IP/Tech Law students. Other students wishing to request special permission to enroll must email the professor - gupchurch@thompsoncoburn.com .]  
An in-depth study of selected topics in intellectual property litigation. Some knowledge of intellectual property law and federal civil procedure is presumed. The focus of the course will be on topics that are of current interest and importance in intellectual property litigation. For example, patent claim construction will be examined in depth, both from the substantive and procedural/evidentiary sides. Litigation issues concerning Internet usage of intellectual property will also be covered in depth. Students will be expected to prepare five or six papers of twelve to twenty pages in length. Each topic addressed will involve a detailed examination of the relevant law, an investigation of any evidentiary issues, and a consideration of the relevant procedural steps. Most topics will be addressed for two or three weeks. Topics for next semester will be chosen from: Claim Construction-Markman Briefs and Hearings; Prosecution History Estoppel-Festo and its progeny (currently before the Supreme Court); Distribution of Copyrighted Material over the Internet-Napster and subsequent suits; Expert Witnesses-Application of Daubert to intellectual property litigation; DCMA-Effect of Digital Millennium Copyright Act provisions on free speech and research; Internet Jurisdiction-Examination of latest cases; Discovery-Proving various patent defenses.

Advanced Legal Research

 Phil Berwick

W74 523B SEC 01              (2 hours)              WED FRI 9:30 - 10:30 AM Enrollment limit: 22

Open only to students who took first-year LRW during the 2000-2001 (or a prior) school year. The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to important legal research materials not covered in the first year research and writing program. Topics to be covered include: federal legislative history research, research in international law, research in selected foreign jurisdictions, legal research using electronic databases and the use of the publications available in each topic area. Questions to be addressed include: where does one start; why is one publication better than the other; when does one use electronic instead of print publications; when does one end the information gathering process? The final grade will be based on three short assignments (10% each), one longer bibliographic essay (60%) and class attendance and participation (10%). [Note: Students who took LRW in 2001-2002 will be offered an Adv Legal Research course during the 2003-2004 school year that is updated to reflect the recent changes in the first-year LRW course.]

Advanced Practical Criminal Procedure

 Hon. Michael Burton Hon. Jack Garvey

W74 607A SEC 01          (3 credits)                          THU 5:00 - 8:00 PM Enrollment limit: 12

This applied skills course will examine various aspects of client representation and advocacy from a perspective unique to criminal practice. Topics covered will include initial interviews( of clients or victims), grand jury and preliminary hearings, discovery, pretrial motions and hearings, plea bargaining, voir dire, expert witnesses, jury instructions, sentencing, and post conviction proceedings. For each topic, there will be both assigned readings and practice exercises (which include either classroom simulations or short written assignments). Each class will have a prominent local prosecutor or defense attorney as a guest lecturer. Regular attendance and preparation are required. Students will be graded based on class participation, classroom performance in the simulations, and the written assignments. Prerequisite: Evidence. Students are encouraged to take trial advocacy prior to taking this course (although it is not a prerequisite).

Advanced Trial Advocacy
W75 503A (2 hours)

Section 01: WED 4:00 - 7:00 PM David Rosen
Section 02 TUE  6:30 - 9:30 PM Steven Holtshouser
Section 03: MON  6:00 - 9:00 PM Kevin Curran

Enrollment limit: 6 per section

Prerequisites: Trial Practice & Procedure (Note that Evidence is a prerequisite for Trial Practice & Procedure.) This course provides students who expect to be involved in litigation after graduation with an opportunity to further develop skills learned in the basic Trial Practice and Procedure course as well as to learn new trial skills, including the use of computers in the courtroom. It is designed for students who intend to go into litigation. The course will focus on techniques used in federal courts and will use actual case and investigative materials from federal criminal cases. Required work for the course will be similar to that done for the basic Trial Practice course, except that there will be less time spent on lecture and demonstration and more time on skills performance and so the work will be more extensive. The final class will involve trying a criminal case to a jury, but in a more complete format than that of the Trial Practice class. To account for some inevitable overlap with the basic Trial course, the course is for two credits but will meet once a week for three hours. It will be graded on a modified pass/fail basis [(HP90/94), (P),(LP74/78), (F65/70)]. Grade will be determined by the student’s performance on simulation assignments, other work assigned during the semester, and the final trial, as well as weekly class participation. WITHDRAWAL POLICY: To ensure that slots in this limited enrollment course are not left unfilled, IF YOU ARE ENROLLED IN THIS COURSE AFTER Monday, December 30, YOU WILL NOT BE PERMITTED TO DROP THE COURSE. In other words, any student enrolled in the course as of the above date will receive a grade for the course and risks receiving a failing grade.

Alternative Dispute Resolution 
        (see Mediation Theory & Practice)

 

BUSINESS PLANNING & DRAFTING: THE DEAL      Susan Hogan

W74-583F  SEC 01                        (3 hours)         TUE  THU  1:30-3:00 PM
Enrollment limit: 20 (minimum 10)

Pre/co-requisite: Corporations. This course will offer students an opportunity to learn about the lawyer’s role in business transactions. The course will focus on developing practical skills in negotiation, drafting and organization, and will involve significant role-playing experiences. The course will be structured around a hypothetical transaction involving the sale of a privately held corporation and will culminate in a mock closing of the transaction.  Lectures will address substantive legal concerns as well as practical issues that may arise in the course of a merger/acquisition transaction, including the letter of intent, tax and other structuring considerations, financing methods, regulatory constraints, due diligence review and drafting of transaction documents.  Students will be divided into buyer and seller teams for purposes of the mock transaction and will be expected to devote significant time outside of class to working with their teams and with "opposing counsel” to prepare transaction documents. There will also be several brief individual drafting assignments.  There will be no final examination. There will be an attendance policy. Grades for the course will be based on drafting assignments, in-class negotiation sessions and general class participation.

Commercial Real Estate Practice and Drafting  Scott Hammel

W74 710B SEC 01              (2 hours)                         TUE 6:30 - 8:30 PM Enrollment limit: 20

This course will be a theory and practice course, combining the study of substantive law with practical application, drafting and problem solving. The course is planned and directed toward students considering commercial real estate practice. Students taking this course will get an exposure to common issues arising in commercial real estate acquisition and lease transactions. Throughout the course, students will be asked to discuss and role play the relative positions and motivations of the seller and purchaser or lessor and lessee, as applicable, in an acquisition or lease of commercial real estate. Although the basic real estate transactions course is not a prerequisite, this commercial real estate course will continue and expand upon many topics covered in the basic course. Attendance and preparation will be required. The final grade will be based on class participation, drafting assignments throughout the semester, and a final exam.

Complex Civil Litigation

James Bennett

W74 651A SEC 01            (2 hours)                          WED 6:00 - 8:00 PM Enrollment limit: 30

This two credit hour course will explore the issues which arise in a typical large-scale civil suit involving multiple parties and will cover most of the major stages of litigation (including settlement), other than trial and appeal. The focus of the course will be on aspects of litigation largely unique to larger or more complex cases. An emphasis will be placed on class actions and cases involving disputes in multiple courts in different parts of the country. The course will focus on practical strategic concerns that arise in these cases and on developing writing skills needed to prepare the types of pleadings that are typically filed in these cases. The course will not require substantial research. Students will be graded based on class participation, drafting assignments, and a final exam.

Construction Law: Practice and Drafting Issues In Development, Design and Contracting 

Joseph Colagiovanni

W74 710A SEC 01                 (2 hours)                    MON 6:00 - 8:00 PM Enrollment limit: 20

The focus of this applied skills course will be three-fold. First, to provide the overview needed to learn how the various documents that comprise the total construction development package relate to each other. Second, to familiarize students with the language and purpose of the most common forms. Third, to give students practical experience in revising the standard documents in order to protect the interest of their clients. Each class will focus on a brief problem description, which will identify various parties and issues relating to the general topic to be discussed (e.g., termination provisions, scope of work, ownership of documents, etc.) Regular attendance and preparation will be required. There are 4 papers and a final contract drafting exercise. The final grade will be based on the drafting exercises and on class participation.

Corporate Finance Planning & Drafting

Thomas Kinsock

W74 539F SEC 01                 (2 hours)                       WED 3:00-5:00 PM Enrollment limit: 24

This course will serve as an introduction to the principles and practices of corporate finance from the specific vantage point of a legal practitioner. Course work will emphasize the practical over the theoretical, both in analysis and in application. To the extent possible, "real life" examples drawn from the world of corporate finance will be used as vehicles for instruction and criticism. Exercises in drafting financial instruments or financing plans will proceed in a context of specific problems faced by specific business enterprises, as extracted from the journals of modern business and finance. The course work will consist of selected drafting assignments, a final exam and mandatory class participation. The drafting assignments, three to five in number, will constitute a significant portion of the overall class grade (25% - 33%). The final exam will be take-home and will contain both analytical and drafting questions. It will be the largest component of the grade. Structured class participation also will represent a significant element of the overall class grade (e.g., 25%). Class participation will include at least one assigned presentation and a negotiation workshop. In addition, as part of the class participation component, the course will contain a "negotiation workshop" feature, in which designated pairs of students will be assigned as opposing counsel in a financing transaction, representing issuer or investor, respectively. Pre/Co-requisite: Corporations (or corporate finance experience).

IP

Cyberspace Law Charles Fendell / Mark Sableman

W75 501B SEC 01             (3 hours)              MON WED 5:00 - 6:30 PM Enrollment limit: 30

This course will examine the law of information and commerce on the Internet. It will consider the special liabilities of various Internet users (conduits, content providers, and users), the duties and liabilities flowing from typical Internet actions and activities (domain name use, electronic commerce, linking, use of trademarks and copyrighted materials, parody, disparagement, collection of private information), current and proposed laws and regulations directed to Internet activities (privacy, indecency, anti-spam, anti-hacking, etc.), and the laws, regulations, and structures that govern the Internet (ICANN and its predecessors). The course will consider how practitioners handle Internet issues, in adapting existing laws and precedents to Internet issues, in helping clients prevent problems, and in resolving disputes informally or through litigation. Although the course will focus for the most part on issues unique to the Internet, certain traditional legal issues that arise frequently in Internet law, such as trademark infringement through domain names, and the sufficiency of Internet activities for jurisdictional purposes, will be examined. Grades will be based on class participation and regular assignments throughout the semester in which students will address hypothetical practical cyberspace law issues. There will be no final exam. It is highly recommended that students have taken or be concurrently enrolled in any of the following courses: Introduction to Intellectual Property Law; Copyright & Related Rights; and Trademark Practice.

IP

Entertainment Law Planning & Drafting

 Mike Kahn /
Jeff Michelman / 
Donna Schmitt

W74 528B SEC 01                    (3 hours)       MON WED 5:30 - 7:00 PM Enrollment limit: 20

This applied-skills course will offer practical experience in dealing with transactional and litigation issues unique to the practice of entertainment law. The class will cover agreement common to movies, television, live theater, music, and print publishing. Drafting assignments will relate to creative control, credit, compensation, transfer of rights, and related issues. Grading is based upon drafting assignments and class participation. Students enrolling in the course will find it helpful to have had, or be enrolled in Introduction to Intellectual Property Law; Copyright and Related Rights.

Environmental Moot Court

Michael Koby

W75 605N SEC 01        (1 hour)
Enrollment limit: 96

[Students must register online for this intramural competition.] Note this course has special add/drop dates determined by the student board and faculty advisor. Students must attend the informational meeting at the beginning of the semester. Students work in teams of two for the preparation of an appellate brief and the presentation of a minimum of two oral arguments concerning an environmental law issue. Semi-finalists are selected based on their written brief score and oral argument scores from the two preliminary rounds. The winning team represents the law school in the National Environmental Moot Court Competition. This course is graded on a credit/no credit basis. [Students should keep in mind the limitations regarding credit toward their degree for competition work (as a participant or board member): 1) a maximum of 4 total credits from competitions; 2) only one competition per semester.]

Estate Planning and Drafting

Lawrence Brody

W74 628A SEC 01    (3 hours)                           TUE  THU 4:30-6:00 PM Enrollment limit: 20

As the name indicates, this is an applied estate planning course where students will have the chance to use a computerized drafting system to draft all or a portion of the various legal documents used in the estate planning process, including a simple will, a marital will, a revocable trust, a revocable insurance trust, an irrevocable insurance trust, an irrevocable inter vivos trust, a durable power of attorney, and a living will. In addition, the course involves consideration of a number of sophisticated planning situations and an understanding of the transfer tax provisions of the Internal Revenue Code and Regulations, as well as techniques necessary for the acquisition of a moderate level of expertise in the field. Class time will be devoted to a discussion of the planning techniques; some non-class time will be devoted to watching videotapes on how to use the drafting system and its use to draft documents. A small portion of the grade in the course will be based on the drafting assignments and student participation in class meetings; the majority of the grade will be based on a final examination (focusing on the planning concepts discussed in class). Attendance and preparation are expected and lack thereof is likely to have an adverse effect on the "participation" portion of the grade and on what the examination will cover. Readings for each class hour will be rather substantial because of the advanced level of the course and may, on occasion, be as much as 30 or 40 pages. In addition, students are expected to make considerable use of estate planning form books, which can be found in the library. Pre/corequisite: Estate & Gift Taxation. Trust & Estates, while not required, would provide useful background information.

Intellectual Property Moot Court: Patents and Copyrights

Charles McManis

W75 606M SEC 01 (2 hours - posted to spring semester)
Enrollment limit: 6
                       [Student do not register online for this course.] 
Second-year and third-year JDs will be selected for this moot court competition by tryouts in the fall semester. Those selected will prepare briefs and participate in the Giles Sutherland Rich Regional Moot Court Competition, held in Chicago during the spring semester. Team members will receive two hours of academic credit, graded on a credit/no-credit basis, to be posted in the spring semester. While there are no formal prerequisites or corequisites for this moot court competition, preference will be given to students who have taken and/or are enrolled in patent- or copyright-related courses. [Students should keep in mind the limitations regarding credit toward their degree for competition work (as a participant or board member): 1) a maximum of 4 total credits from competitions; 2) only one competition per semester.]

Intellectual Property Moot Court: Trademarks & Unfair Competition

Charles McManis

W75 606N SEC 01 (2 hours - posted to spring semester) 
Enrollment Limit: 6
                    [Students do not register online for this course.] 
Second-year and third-year JDs will be selected for this moot court competition by tryouts in the fall semester. Those selected will prepare briefs and participate in the Saul Lefkowitz Brand Names Regional Moot Court Competition, held in Chicago during the spring semester. Team members will receive two hours of academic credit, graded on a credit/no-credit basis, to be posted in the spring semester. While there are no formal prerequisites or corequisites for this moot court competition, preference will be given to students who have taken and/or are enrolled in trademark-related courses. [Students should keep in mind the limitations regarding credit toward their degree for competition work (as a participant or board member): 1) a maximum of 4 total credits from competitions; 2) only one competition per semester.]

International Moot Court Team

Leila Sadat

W75 612S SEC 01                 (2 hours; 1 hr posted to fall + 1 hr posted to spring) Enrollment limit: 5
                   [Students do not register online for this course.] 
Students will be selected for the International Moot Court Team by fall tryouts open only to 2L's. (Information about tryouts will be distributed to students at the beginning of the school year.) The team will work together to prepare an appellate brief or memorial and will participate in the Philip C. Jessup International Law Regional, and potentially National and International competition. The course grade is credit/no credit; one credit hour posted in the fall semester, and the other credit hour posted in the spring semester. The team also will function as a board and run the tryouts for the following year. Pre/corequisite (subject to waiver by special permission of instructor): International Law. [Students should keep in mind the limitations regarding credit toward their degree for competition work (as a participant or board member): 1) a maximum of 4 total credits from competitions; 2) only one competition per semester.]

Media Litigation

Benjamin Lipman

W74 528C SEC 01          (2 hours)                                      TUE 6:30-8:30 Enrollment limit: 20

This course will address the unique nature of litigation practice as it applies to media clients. It will cover all parts of litigation other than settlement and trial. The focus of the course will be upon the unique way in which the stages of litigation apply to representing media clients, emphasizing the extent to which the First Amendment varies civil practice within the media law context. The course will involve drafting pleadings and legal briefs with regard to (1) defamation actions, (2) subpoenas to the media and (3) Sunshine Law issues. The course will not involve substantial research. Grading will be based upon the writing assignments, class participation and the final.

MEDIATION THEORY & PRACTICE

Karen Tokarz

W74 578A SEC 01  - WED 6:30-9:30 PM - Leonard Frankel
W74 578A SEC 02 - MON 6:00-9:00 PM - Alan Freed
W74 578A SEC 03 - THU 6:30 - 9:30 PM - Art Hinshaw
W74 578A SEC 04 - THU 6:30-9:30 PM - C.J. Larkin

Enrollment limit: 16 per section   (3 hours) 

(Formerly known as Alternative Dispute Resolution; Students who have taken ADR are not eligible to take Mediation Theory & Practice.) This course introduces students to the theory and practice of mediation (facilitated negotiation). The course will focus on the development of both analytical and interpersonal skills because the ability to participate successfully in negotiations and mediations, as an attorney advocate or mediator, rests on a combination of the two. Analysis is important because negotiators and mediators cannot develop promising strategies without a deep understanding of the context of the situation, the interests of the parties, the opportunities and barriers to creating and claiming value on a sustainable basis, and the range of possible moves and countermoves both at and away from the bargaining table. Interpersonal skills are important because negotiation and mediation are essentially processes of communication, relationship and trust building (or breaking), and mutual persuasion. This course is predicated on the belief that theory informs practice, and practice informs theory. The course aims to develop a set of conceptual frameworks that should help students better analyze mediations and prepare more effectively for the interpersonal aspects of mediations. Through analysis of case studies and discussion of articles, students examine lessons from both theorists and practitioners. Through participation in simulations, students have the opportunity to exercise powers of communication and persuasion, and to experiment with a variety of tactics and strategies. The simulation exercises draw from a wide variety of contexts and their aim is to provide concepts and tools that apply to all types of mediations. Student grades will be based on a variety of factors, including papers and performance on in-class and out-of-class simulations. Students will be graded according to the standard numeric grading scale. Because of the nature of this course, one student’s absence will almost always adversely affect at least one other student’s classroom experience. Thus, failure to attend may have an adverse impact on the absent student’s grade. There are no prerequisites for this course. WITHDRAWAL POLICY: In order to try to avoid the sort of last-minute shuffling that, in the past, has resulted in interested students being notified of openings too late for them readily to change their schedules and enroll, the following policy is in effect: IF YOU ARE ENROLLED IN THIS COURSE AFTER MONDAY, DECEMBER 30,YOU WILL NOT BE PERMITTED TO DROP THE COURSE. In other words, any student enrolled in the course as of the above date will receive a grade for the course; and risks receiving a failing grade.

IP

Patent Drafting

Bryan Wheelock

W74 623G  SEC 01               (3 hours)               TUE THU 6:30 - 8:00 PM Enrollment limit: 20

Students will prepare and prosecute patent applications. Activities will include studying the results of [conducting] patent searches and preparing patentability opinions; drafting patent applications; preparing responses to official office actions; and confronting intellectual property issues related to strategic commercial transactions involving the inventions contained in the patent applications. A background in engineering and business is highly recommended.

E

PRACTICAL ETHICS FOR CIVIL LITIGATION

Michael Downey

W74-561C  SEC 01                (2 hours)           MON  6:30-8:30
Enrollment limit: 24

A civil litigator often faces ethical dilemmas, including how to solicit clients, resolve conflicts of interest, and handle confidential information. This course seeks to help students identify and resolve such dilemmas. The curriculum will focus on the professional rules that govern a civil litigator's interactions with clients, opposing parties and counsel, tribunals, and others. Hypotheticals, problems, and roleplays based on real situations will be used. Grades will be based on class participation, a short mid-term drafting assignment, and a final drafting assignment final/take-home examination.

Pretrial Practice and Procedure 
(Employment Litigation)                                                            Pauline Kim

W74 658N SEC 01 James Nowogrocki TUE  5:00-8:00
W74 658N SEC 02 Michael Ferry WED  4:00-7:00
W74 658N SEC 03 Kate Denner WED 5:00-8:00
W74 658N SEC 04 Paula Finlay Luepke FRI  12:00-3:00

Enrollment limit: 12 per section (3 hours)
This course will focus on developing the skills necessary for effective client representation at the pretrial stage of litigation, from the initial interview through settlement negotiations, in the context of employment litigation. The drafting and in-class simulation exercises are centered around two principal cases -- both dealing with allegedly unlawful job terminations. Successful completion of the written and in-class exercises will require mastery of basic lawyering skills, as well as the ability to analyze the factual situations presented under the appropriate substantive laws. Thus, students should expect to do some legal research throughout the semester in order to learn and correctly apply the relevant employment laws. There will be weekly reading assignments and regular individual written assignments, such as pleadings, discovery requests, and settlement documents. Students are also expected to participate in simulations of the lawyering process in class each week. The course will be graded on a modified pass/fail basis (HP90/94, P, LP74/78, F65/70). Grades will be based on performance on written assignments, in-class simulations and participation in class discussion. Each section of the class, each limited to a maximum of 12 students, will meet separately throughout the semester. Please note that each section is an independent class which meets at a different time with a different instructor or instructors. Course work in Professional Ethics, Evidence, Employment Law and Employment Discrimination may be helpful if taken before or simultaneously with this course, but are not prerequisites. WITHDRAWAL POLICY: In order to try to avoid the sort of last-minute shuffling that, in the past, has resulted in interested students being notified of Pretrial openings too late for them readily to change their schedules and enroll, the following policy is in effect: IF YOU ARE ENROLLED IN THIS COURSE AFTER MONDAY, DECEMBER 30, YOU WILL NOT BE PERMITTED TO DROP THE COURSE. In other words, any student enrolled in the course as of the above date will receive a grade for the course and risks receiving a failing grade.

IP

SPORTS LAW PLANNING & DRAFTING

Robert "Bob" Lattinville

W74-510D sec 01                   (2 hrs)                       WED  7:00-9:00 PM
Enrollment limit: 24

This course examines the legal and regulatory environment of professional and amateur sports. The lawyer's expanding opportunities and responsibilities are explored in this $100 billion a year industry commanding expertise in numerous and diverse practice areas. A working knowledge of antitrust, labor, constitutional, administrative and contract law will be established and applied. The course will survey the breadth of issues, conventional and emerging, which challenge the lawyers practicing in the sports industry. Depth of study will be achieved via class projects and a final drafting exam addressing fundamental principles of amateur and professional sports law as well as recent developments in this growing area.

Trial Advocacy Competition

Paula Finlay Luepke
Hon. David Mason
Mark Rudder

W75-703A SEC 01          (2 hours - posted in the spring)
Enrollment limited: 12; subject to professors' discretion.
                 [Students do not register online for this course.] 
Upper-level students in good standing are eligible to try-out for the trial team. Try-outs take place during the fall semester; try-out information is distributed to students by the Clinical Program Office, Room 589. This program involves intense training in trial advocacy and evidence law. There is also substantive work in all aspects of torts and criminal law rotating year to year. You will be expected to do substantive legal research as part of your case preparation. [Students should keep in mind the limitations regarding credit toward their degree for competition work (as a participant or board member): 1) a maximum of 4 total credits from competitions; 2) only one competition per semester.]

Trial Practice & Procedure

Katherine Goldwasser

W74 597M SEC 01   (3 hours)                         MON 5:00 - 6:00 PM and 
                                                                                  THU 6:00 - 8:00 PM
Enrollment limit: 48
This course focuses on the trial phase of litigation from the perspective of a practicing attorney. The first part of the course will be devoted to learning about and performing various aspects of the trial of a lawsuit, including the development of a theory and theme, jury selection, opening statement, direct and cross-examination of lay witnesses and experts, the use and introduction of real and demonstrative evidence, and closing argument. Toward the end of the semester, students will prepare for and conduct two complete trials. Required work for the course will include both reading and written assignments. Students also will be required to prepare extensively for simulations. The class will meet twice a week for a total of three hours, divided between one 1-hour session and one 2 hour-session. In the 1-hour session, the entire class will meet with Professor Goldwasser. In the 2-hour session, students will meet in small groups with the adjunct professors. The course will be graded on a modified pass/fail basis (HP90/94, P, LP74/78, F65/70). Grade will be determined by the student's performance on written and simulation assignments and participation in class discussion. Regular attendance is required. Prerequisite: Students must have completed Evidence prior to taking this course; Pretrial is not a prerequisite for Trial. WITHDRAWAL POLICY: In order to try to avoid the sort of last-minute shuffling that, in the past, has resulted in interested students being notified of Trial openings too late for them readily to change their schedules and enroll, the following policy is in effect: IF YOU ARE ENROLLED IN THIS COURSE AFTER MONDAY, DECEMBER 30, YOU WILL NOT BE PERMITTED TO DROP THE COURSE. In other words, any student enrolled in the course as of the above date will receive a grade for the course and risks receiving a failing grade.