Office of the Law School Registrar:
Course Directory
CLINICS AND EXTERNSHIP COURSES - Spring 1999

NOTE: Under the faculty rules, students may take only one practicum course (e.g., Congressional Clinic, Judicial Clerkship, Supervised Practicum, all clinics) per semester.

Registration: Any student is welcome to submit Revised Pre-Registration forms for Seminars, Clinics, Trial & Pretrial for the “new lottery,” if the new offerings or canceled courses affect their preferences. Students who previously submitted Pre-Registration Forms for Seminars, Clinics, Trial & Pretrial are not, however, required to submit new forms. If a student does not submit a revised form, we will use the original Pre-registration Form(s) he or she submitted for purposes of the original lottery. We will simply ignore any course that has been canceled. REVISED PRE-REGISTRATION FORMS FOR SEMINARS, CLINICS, TRIAL& PRETRIAL CAN BE FOUND IN THE “STUDENT INFORMATION & FORMS” AREA TO THE LEFT OF THE STUDENT MAILBOXES. STUDENTS MUST SUBMIT REVISED PRE-REGISTRATION FORMS TO ROOM 303 BY 5:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 1998, TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE “NEW LOTTERY.”

CIVIL JUSTICE CLINIC Aiken/Norwood

W74-797B sec 01 (6 hrs)

Enrollment limit: 16
In this clinical course, students learn the lawyering skills necessary to promote and protect their clients' interests while gaining knowledge of our legal system's ability and/or inability to redress. This course offers students real-life experiences through supervised participation in actual cases. The cases will primarily involve family law, domestic violence and consumer cases. Students may engage in initial interviews, client counseling, discovery, negotiations, motion practice, hearings, trial preparation and witness examination at depositions and trials. Throughout the supervised litigation process, the students learn to develop legal theories and case strategies; to conduct fact investigation; and to confront ethical considerations. Students should make every effort to arrange their working hours in order to spend Mon, Wed, and Fri at the clinic office maintained off-campus at Legal Services of Eastern Missouri in the Central West End. Students are required to maintain office hours on Mon, Wed and Fri mornings. Students must spend a minimum of 24 hours a week at the clinic. The course will be graded on a pass/fail basis. There is neither a final exam nor a textbook for this course. There are, however, reading assignments and a mandatory weekly seminar meeting that usually meets Wed afternoons from 1-3 at the clinic office. Students take primary responsibility for cases to which they are assigned and must complete litigation assignments in a timely manner.
Prerequisites or corequisites: A course from the ethics curriculum. The following courses are highly recommended and may affect your priority for placement: Pretrial, Trial, and Evidence. Certification under Rule 13 of the Missouri Supreme Court Rules is required for third year students.
WITHDRAWAL POLICY FOR CIVIL JUSTICE CLINIC:
In order to try to avoid the sort of last-minute shufling that, in the past, has resulted in interested students being notified of Clinic openings too late for them readily to change their schedules and enroll, the following new policy is in effect: IF YOU ARE ENROLLED IN THIS COURSE AS OF MONDAY, DECEMBER 28 (i.e., any time after midnight on that date), YOU WILL NOT BE PERMITTED TO DROP THE COURSE. IN OTHER WORDS, ANY STUDENT ENROLLED IN THE COURSE AS OF THE ABOVE DATE WILL RECEIVE A GRADE OF PASS OR FAIL FOR THE COURSE.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE CLINIC Joy
(To apply for this Clinic: complete a Revised Clinic Pre-Registration Form and return it to Room 303 by Tues, April 7)

W74-790A sec 01 (4-6 hrs)

Enrollment limited to 8 students each semester - Open only to third year students. This clinic provides real life lawyering experience with the criminal justice system at the state trial level. The student’s primary experience will be to serve as a Rule 13 certified attorney with the St. Louis County office of the Missouri Public Defender, which is the second largest criminal defense office in the state. The goal is for each student (1) to take primary responsibility for at least one misdemeanor case serving as lead counsel at trial; (2) to conduct at least one preliminary hearing in a felony case; and (3) to second-chair at least one felony jury trial. At the PD office, students are likely to be actively involved in interviewing clients, investigating crime scenes, interviewing witnesses, performing legal research and writing memoranda and briefs, arguing motions in court, and participating in trials. In addition to his office in the law school, Professor Joy maintains an office at the Public Defender site, works closely with students and supervising attorneys, and directly supervises students on some cases. Students must work at least 16 hrs per week on clinical matters for 4 credits and 24 hrs per week on clinical matters for 6 credits and can expect to spend most of this time away from the law school either at court or in the PD office adjacent to the courthouse. It is important to have at least two mornings free because most court appearances take place in the morning. Students also will meet as a class at the PD office from 1-3 on Wednesdays and 1-3 on some Fridays. There is no textbook, but there will be some reading assignments. This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis. Specific requirements for receiving credit will be set by the professor. There will be no final exam. Students who have completed Evidence, Pretrial, Trial, a course from the ethics curriculum, CJA I, or CJA II, may receive preference. Because the clinic is likely to involve court appearances, it is open only to third-year students who are certified under Rule 13 of the Missouri Supreme Court Rules.
WITHDRAWAL POLICY FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE CLINIC:
In order to try to avoid the sort of last-minute shuffling that, in the past, has resulted in interested students being notified of Clinic openings too late for them readily to change their schedules and enroll, the following new policy is in effect: IF YOU ARE ENROLLED IN THIS COURSE AS OF WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 1998, FOR THE FALL SEMESTER AND MONDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1998, FOR THE SPRING SEMESTER (i.e., any time after midnight on those dates), YOU WILL NOT BE PERMITTED TO DROP THE COURSE. In other words, any student enrolled in the course as of the above applicable dates will receive a grade of Pass or Fail for the course.

CONGRESSIONAL / ADMINISTRATIVE LAW CLINIC Kaplan

W74-786B sec 01 (11 hrs)

Enrollment limited.
(Must be taken in conjunction with ETHICS OF LAWYERING IN GOVERNMENT.)
Each student admitted to this Clinic is assigned to either a Congressional Office or Administrative Agency. Admission to the Clinic is by application only and occurs one year in advance. Student and instructor collaborate during the fall in making office selection/assignment. Work begins when Spring semester starts and ends the last day of classes. Students keep the hours of their office (usually 9 a.m. to 6 or 7 p.m., sometimes later, sometimes weekends). Students meet individually with the instructor and as a group on a regular basis in Washington D.C.
Students interested in Congress will be placed in a Congressional Office where he/she will do professional staff work, primarily research and writing on legislation. The externship will also provide students with the opportunity to observe Congressional hearings, mark-ups and floor debate. A course in legislation is recommended.
Those interested in administrative agency will be placed in a federal administrative agency in Washington D.C. in a subject area that matches the student's interest. The student will do hands-on professional staff work of the type commonly done in the agency office. The externship will also provide students the opportunity to observe administrators making decisions about such agency activities as rule making, advising the public and case handling. The Administrative Law course is highly recommended for this placement. Students are also encouraged to take, as preparation, courses in the subject area of the agency in which they will be placed. Of the 11 credits, 3 are graded numerically and 8 are graded pass/fail.

EMPLOYMENT LAW AND PUBLIC POLICY CLINIC Tokarz

W74-796A sec 01 (4 hrs)

Enrollment limit: 8 - 12 (6 hrs with permission of instructor)
The goal of this clinical course is to examine law and public policy within the context of employment law and civil rights practice. In this clinic, students work at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and in selected plaintiff and union law firms; students handle employment cases involving race, sex, age, and physical disability discrimination, wrongful terminations, workers' compensation, employment compensation, and labor grievances. Students on occasion are allowed to work in legislative offices and in offices handling sports or immigration related employment issues. This course offers students hands-on exposure to litigation, legislative, and administrative law practice. All students engage in advocacy, interviewing, counseling, fact investigation, negotiation, as well as drafting of documents. On rare occasions, certified third-year students may participate in depositions, hearings or motions arguments. Students spend a minimum of 16 hrs per week (for 4 credits) handling cases and projects under the supervision of Professor Tokarz and a cooperating field attorney or legislator. Students are required to complete several litigation or legislative assignments relevant to their cases and observation requirements. There are periodic weekly seminar meetings with Professor Tokarz and the cooperating attorneys and legislators. The Clinic seminar usually meets on Friday from 8-10 a.m., and occasionally on Wednesday or Friday from 3-5 p.m. Clinic students are urged to keep their schedules open during these time slots. The course will be graded on a pass/fail basis. There is no final exam. There is no textbook for this course, but there will be some reading assignments.
Pre/co-requisites: A course from the ethics curriculum. Depending on which placement you choose, the following courses are highly recommended and may affect your priority for placement: Employment Discrimination, Employment Law, Labor Law, Legislation, Administrative Law, Constitutional Law II, Evidence, Pretrial, and Immigration Law. Students are not required to have Rule 13 certification.
WITHDRAWAL POLICY FOR EMPLOYMENT LAW AND PUBLIC POLICY CLINIC:
In order to try to avoid the sort of last-minute shufling that, in the past, has resulted in interested students being notified of Clinic openings too late for them readily to change their schedules and enroll, the following new policy is in effect: IF YOU ARE ENROLLED IN THIS COURSE AS OF MONDAY, DECEMBER 28 (i.e., any time after midnight on that date), YOU WILL NOT BE PERMITTED TO DROP THE COURSE. IN OTHER WORDS, ANY STUDENT ENROLLED IN THE COURSE AS OF THE ABOVE DATE WILL RECEIVE A GRADE OF PASS OR FAIL FOR THE COURSE.

JUDICIAL CLERKSHIP Bobinette

W74-654 sec 01 (3 or 4 hrs)
15 minute bi-weekly meeting with professor on MON 5:30 - 7:30

Enrollment limit: 12
This externship course offers students a structured, hands-on exposure to civil and criminal litigation from the judicial perspective. Students work as part-time law clerks under the supervision of local, state or federal trial or appellate judges. Students observe hearings, trials and other court proceedings; perform extensive legal research; and draft a series of legal memoranda relevant to cases under submission by the courts. The course provides an opportunity for students to develop advanced legal research and writing skills. To receive 3 credit hrs, students in the Judicial Clerkship practicum will be required to work approximately 12 hrs/week and produce 3 major legal memoranda or 30 pages of polished research and writing. To receive 4 credit hours, students will be required to work approximately 16 hrs/week and produce 4 major legal memoranda or 40 pages of polished research and writing. Students have regularly scheduled, individual meetings with the course instructor and are required to submit an outline, first draft, and final draft for each legal memorandum. There is no final exam.
Pre/co-requisites: A course from the ethics curriculum. Note: Some Courts demand that students have legal writing experience or have demonstrated their scholastic excellence. Students are not required to have Rule 13 certification.
REGISTRATION AND WITHDRAWAL POLICY FOR SPRING 1999 JUDICIAL CLERKSHIP:
STUDENTS WHO ARE NOTIFIED THAT THEY ARE ENROLLED IN A SPRING 1999 JUDICIAL CLERKSHIP MUST ATTEND THE ORIENTATION MEETING WITH PROFESSOR BOBINETTE ON MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1998 (time TBA). Students will be required to submit preference placement forms to the clinical office, room 589, by Tuesday, November 24. Sudents will be notified of their placements by Wednesday, December 2, and must accept or reject these placement assignments by FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4. ONCE A STUDENT HAS ACCEPTED THEIR PLACEMENT, THEY WILL NOT BE ALLOWED TO DROP THEIR SPRING 1999 JUDICIAL CLERKSHIP AFTER FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, AND WILL RECEIVE A GRADE (Pass or Fail) FOR THE COURSE.