Faculty's International Presentations Wide-Ranging

Numerous law faculty members are presenting scholarship at conferences internationally and are involved in international law projects ranging from comparative law and economics to religious liberty law, Japanese private law, European Union administrative law, family law, China’s judicial disciplinary system, international tax law, and patents and world health.

A sampling of recent activities includes:

Susan Appleton presented her paper, “Two Kinds of Parents,” as part of the panel on “Children in the Post-Nuclear Family” at this summer’s 30th Congress of the International Academy of Law and Mental Health in Padua, Italy.  She also presented her paper, “Family Law, Sex Law, and Popular Culture,” as part of the “Cultural and Legal Cliteracy” panel at this summer’s annual meeting of the Law & Society Conference in Berlin.

Kathleen Clark presented a paper about government lawyers and confidentiality norms at the Law & Society Conference in Berlin.

Gerrit De Geest will travel to Europe this month to attend the public defense of Ph.D. dissertations of two students who conducted their research under his supervision.  He is presently working on a commissioned anthology for Edward Elgar on Comparative Law and Economics and a paper on “Specific Performance Versus Damages: Comparative Law and Economics” for the Common Principles of European Contract Law project of the Economic Impact Group.

John Drobak spoke at the Conference of the Global Economic History Network in Utrecht, The Netherlands, on September 20-22.  He was the discussant for the first panel of the conference.  He is also working with the Journal of Law & Public Policy on an upcoming Symposium titled “Law and the New Institutional Economics.”

Leigh Hunt Greenhaw co-taught two courses with Michael Koby at Aoyama Gakuin University (AGU) in Japan.  The courses, both on “Distinctive Elements of U.S. Religious Liberty Law,” were offered at the undergraduate and graduate level.  She also gave a presentation to the AGU faculty on “Religious Liberty Law Under the Roberts Court.”  She also taught during the Law School’s inaugural Summer Institute in U.S. Law in St. Louis.

Peter Joy spoke at the 5th Conference of the International Journal of Clinical Legal Education in Johannesburg, South Africa.  He delivered the keynote address, titled, “Legal Education and the Ethical Development of the Legal Professional: Promoting Justice and Fairness.”  He continues to consult with Japanese legal educators about clinical legal education, legal ethics, and trial skills training.

Michael Koby co-taught two courses with Leigh Greenhawat Aoyama Gakuin University (AGU) in Japan.  The courses, both on “Distinctive Elements of U.S. Religious Liberty Law,” were offered at the undergraduate and graduate level.  He also gave a presentation to the AGU faculty on “Use of Legislative History by U.S. Courts.”  He also taught during the Law School’s inaugural Summer Institute in U.S. Law in St. Louis.

Bruce La Pierre taught a three-week course titled “Comparative Federalism” in the Law School’s 2007 Summer Institute for Global Justice.  He co-taught the course with Prof. Giovanni Guzzetta of the University of Rome Tor Vergata.

Ron Levin spoke at the Law & Society Association Conference in Berlin as part of a panel titled “Administrative Law in the European Union: Lessons for Americans?”  The panel focused on his ongoing work on behalf of the American Bar Association, analyzing the administrative law and practices of the European Union.

Wei Luo co-organized a conference in Beijing on government information publishing and dissemination with Tsinghua University School of Law and the China National Library at Tsinghua University School of Law.  More than 40 representatives of Chinese governmental agencies, as well as representatives of a number of Chinese law faculties, attended the conference.  The purpose of the conference was to encourage the Chinese government to make information more accessible to the public. The conference was funded in part by a grant from the US-China Legal Cooperation Fund. He also spoke at the 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Law Libraries in New Orleans, along with Cheng Zhen, the Director of the Information Center of Chinese National Library.

Andrew Martin visited Seoul National University in Seoul, Korea, this summer, meeting with representatives of the political science and international relations departments.

Laura Rosenbury presented her paper, “Children as Subjects,” as part of the “Children in the Post-Nuclear Family” panel at this summer’s 30th Congress of the International Academy of Law and Mental Health in Padua, Italy.  She also presented a paper (co-written with Jennifer Rothman) titled “Beyond Intimacy” as part of the “Cultural and Legal Cliteracy” panel at the Law & Society Conference in Berlin.

Neil Richards’s paper, “Privacy’s Other Path: Recovering the Law of Confidentiality,” will be published in this year’s volume of the Georgetown Law Journal.  The paper, co-written by George Washington law professor Daniel Solove, compares American and British approaches to privacy law.

Adam Rosenzweig will present his paper, “The Expressive Function of International Tax,” on a panel titled “Taxation as a Global Socio-Legal Phenomenon” at the International Law Association’s 2007 International Law Weekend in New York, October 25-27.

Leila Sadat taught a three-week course titled “Law & Terrorism” in the Law School’s 2007 Summer Institute for Global Justice.  She co-taught the course with Assistant Dean Michael Peil.  This week, she is speaking on a panel on the genocide jurisprudence of the International Court of Justice at a conference in Cleveland, Ohio.  She also moderated at the “International Humanitarian Law Dialogs,” a roundtable discussion held in Chautauqua, New York, involving current and former international prosecutors from several international criminal tribunals, past and present.  Her article titled “Extraordinary Rendition, Torture and Other Nightmares from the War on Terror” is being published in an upcoming issue of the George Washington Law Review.

Karen Tokarz, recently named to the faculty of the African & African American Studies Program at Washington University, traveled to South Africa for two weeks this summer, meeting with law faculty members at the University of Western Cape, Cape Town University, and the University of Kwa-Zulu Natal in Durban. She is researching alternative dispute resolution in South Africa and assisting law schools there in the development of dispute resolution law courses. For the sixth summer, she coordinated a team of five students who worked for ten weeks with the Legal Aid Board of South Africa in Durban.  She also assisted a Washington University exchange student in arranging to study at the University of Kwa-Zulu Natal this fall. This brings the total number of Washington University law students who have worked and studied in Africa in the past six years to over 60.