Operators

WilsonWeb has several operators that allow you to form compound search requests.

and
Finds records that contain both of two terms.
in
Finds records that contain a term in a specified field.
near
Finds records that contain both of two terms in the same sentence.
not
Finds records that contain one term but not another.
or
Finds records that contain either or both of two terms.
with
Finds records that contain both of two terms in the same field.

To use an operator:

  1. Type a term in the text entry area of the Search page.
  2. Type one of the operators listed above, depending on how you want to combine the terms.
  3. Type a second term after the operator and click the Submit button.

Note: Beginning a search request with an operator (skipping step 1 above) automatically combines that request with the previous one. For instance, if the search you just completed is radio-tagging, searching for and frogs will give you the same results as if you search for radio-tagging and frogs. Similarly, the search red tide followed by the search in ti is the same as red tide in ti. There are also special limit field operators which can be used to find occurrences of a term or range of terms in the limit field you specify.


AND

Use the and operator in the text entry area of the Search page to retrieve records containing both of two terms. For example, search for dyslexia and child to retrieve only records that contain both dyslexia and child.

Since and eliminates records containing only one of the terms, it is useful for making your search more precise.


IN

Use the in operator in the text entry area of the Search page to search in a specific field. For example, search for 3m in co to retrieve only records with 3M in the Company (CO) field.


NEAR

Use the near operator in the text entry area of the Search page to retrieve records that contain both of two terms in the same sentence. For example, search for dyslexia near child to retrieve only records that contain dyslexia and child in the same sentence. Either term can appear first.

You can add a number to near to specify how close together the terms must be. For example, computer near3 hardware finds the two terms within three words of each other in the same sentence.

Since near requires that the two terms be in the same sentence, it is useful for making your search more precise.


NOT

Use the not operator in the text entry area of the Search page to retrieve records containing one term but not another. For example, search for dyslexia not adult to retrieve only records containing dyslexia but not adult.

Be careful when using not. In the above example, there may be records that mention the word adult, but are predominantly about other forms of dyslexia and that would be relevant to your search; using not would prevent you from retrieving these records.


OR

Use the or operator in the text entry area of the Search page to retrieve records containing either or both of two terms. For example, search for dyslexia or learning disabilities to retrieve records containing either dyslexia or learning disabilities, or both.

The or operator enables you to retrieve synonymous terms, and so is useful for making your search more comprehensive.


WITH

Use the with operator in the text entry area of the Search page to retrieve records containing both of two terms in the same field. For example, search for dyslexia with child to retrieve only records containing dyslexia and child in the same field. Either term can appear first.

Since with requires that the terms be in the same field, it makes your search precise.


Limit Field Operators

Limit fields are specially indexed fields that have relatively few possible values. They allow you to limit your searches to records of a particular characteristic, such as type of publication or language of text.

To search a limit field, type the limit field label in the text entry area of the Search page, followed by =, followed by a value. For example, to retrieve documents originally published in French, type la=french, where LA is the field label for the Language field.

The following operators can also be used with certain limit fields, generally those containing numeric data. Refer to the database Guide to determine the fields to which these apply.

<
less than, such as py<1990
>
greater than, such as py>1991
<=
less than or equal to, such as py<=1989
>=
greater than or equal to, such as py>=1992
-
within a range, such as py=1990-1992

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