Participants - Black Sexual Economies Project

Project Director and Co-Convener:  Adrienne Davis - Washington University Law
Co-Convener:  Mireille Miller-Young - Feminist Studies, University of California at Santa Barbara

Marlon Bailey

Marlon Bailey

Professor Bailey's research interests include: African Diaspora studies, queer diasporas, race, gender, and sexuality, queer theory, Black queer studies, theatre/performance studies, ethnography, and HIV/AIDS (cultural politics, research, and prevention of HIV/AIDS in Black communities).  Dr. Bailey earned his PhD in African Diaspora Studies with a designated emphasis in Women, Gender, and Sexuality, in the Department of African American Studies at the University of California-Berkeley.  Currently, Dr. Bailey is working on a book manuscript that expands his performance ethnographic study of Ballroom Culture, a Black and Latina/o queer culture in North America: Butch Queens up in Pumps: Gender, Performance, and Ballroom Culture in Detroit, is under contract with the University of Michigan Press.  His most recent publications examine performance, HIV/AIDS prevention, and Ballroom Culture.  In addition to his current research, Dr. Bailey has published on Black queer performance and same-sex marriage.  He is also an accomplished professional actor, director, and performance artist. He has performed at professional theatres in Minneapolis, DC, Louisville, and Detroit.  His most recent performance was in "The Hard Evidence of Existence: a Black Gay Sex (Love) Show," at the Thick House in San Francisco, California.  Prior to joining the faculty at IU, Dr. Bailey was a Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellow in Gender and Women's Studies at the University of California-Berkeley from 2005-2007. Profile  

Felice Blake

Marlon Bailey

Felice Blake received her Ph. D. in Literature from the University of California, Santa Cruz in June 2008. She specializes in twentieth-century African American literature, African American studies, and the critical analyses of gender and sexuality. Dr. Blake is currently a University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellow with the English Department at UC Berkeley. She will join the English Department at UC Santa Barbara as an assistant professor in 2011. Her current research analyzes contemporary literary representations of intraracial conflict and cohesion. 
  

Adrienne Davis (Project Director and Co-Convener)

Adrienne Davis

Adrienne D. Davis is the William M. Van Cleve Professor of Law at Washington University Law School, where she teaches contracts, trusts & estates, and a variety of upper-level legal theory courses, including sex equality, law and literature, and slavery.  Her scholarship emphasizes the gendered and private law dimensions of American slavery. She also does work on feminist legal theory and conceptions of justice and reparations.  She is recipient of two grants from the Ford Foundation, the first to explore black women and labor, and the most recent administered through Brandeis University's Feminist Sexual Ethics Project to research women, slavery, sexuality, and religion.  In 2001 Davis was a resident fellow at the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Study and Conference Center.  Davis is currently serving her second term as a Distinguished Lecturer with the Organization of American Historians. She is past chair of the Law and Humanities Section of the Association of American Law Schools and has been on the editorial boards of Law and History Review and Journal of Legal Education. She is the co-author of the book, Privilege Revealed: How Invisible Preference Undermines America (NYU Press), as well as numerous articles and book chapters.  Prior to joining the faculty in January 2008, Davis served as the Reef C. Ivey II Professor of Law at the University of North Carolina and was a professor and co-director of the Gender, Work & Family Project at Washington College of Law, American University.  Davis graduated from Yale College and Yale Law School and clerked for Judge A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.  Profile 

LaMonda Horton-Stallings

Lamonda Horton-Stallings

LaMonda Horton Stallings is Associate Professor of African American and African Diaspora Studies and Gender Studies at Indiana University-Bloomington.  She received her PhD in English from Michigan State University in 2002, her MA from Appalachian State University in 1998, and her BA from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in 1995.She was a Schomburg Scholar. Her research and teaching interests include African American Literature, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Cultural Studies, and Black Folklore.  She has published and forthcoming essays in African American Review, the Journal of Bisexuality, Black Renaissance/Renaissance Noire, Obsidian III, Revista Canaria de Estudios Ingleses, CR: The New Centennial Review, Western Journal of Black Studies, and NWSA. She serves on the editorial board of Proud Flesh: New Afrikan Journal of Culture, Politics, and Consciousness.  Her first book, Mutha is Half a Word!: Intersections of Folklore, Vernacular, Myth, and Queerness in Black Female Culture (Ohio State University Press, 2007), critically engages folk and vernacular theory, black cultural studies, and queer theory to examine the representation of sexual desire in fiction, poetry, stand-up comedy, neo-soul, and hip-hop created by black women. She is currently at work on a second project that aims to theorize the importance of Black erotica. Profile   

 Xavier Livermon

Xavier Livermon

Xavier Livermon has joined the University of Texas at Austin as Assistant Professor of African and African Diaspora Studies. He received his B.A. in Political Science from UC San Diego, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in African Diaspora Studies at UC Berkeley. His dissertation, entitled "Kwaito Bodies in African Diaspora Space: The Politics of Popular Music in Post-Apartheid South Africa" examines how popular performance cultures in post-apartheid South Africa are shaped by Afrodiasporic consciousness as well as the effect these popular performance cultures have on rapidly changing sociopolitical circumstances in contemporary South Africa.  His research interests include examining the role of Africa in African Diaspora Studies, gender and sexuality in the African Diaspora, Black Cultural Studies, and Music and Performance cultures of the African Diaspora. Prior to joining the University of Texas at Austin, he was an Assistant Professor at Wayne State University. From 2006-2008 he was a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Profile 

Jeffrey McCune

Jeffrey McCune

Jeffrey Q. McCune, Jr. shares a joint appointment in the Performing Arts Department and the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program, to which he brings his expertise in the fields of performance studies, critical race and gender theory, and sexuality studies. Prior to joining Washington University, Professor McCune was an Assistant Professor in Women's Studies and American Studies at University of Maryland-College Park. His book, Sexual Discretion: Black Masculinity and the Politics of Passing is forthcoming from University of Chicago Press, Winter 2014. This project examines how the sexual politics of discretion—found in historic narratives of passing—get rearticulated in contemporary performances of “men who have sex with other men who typically identify as straight” (men on the Down Low). Employing ethnography, discourse and media analysis, literary criticism, and performance theory, Sexual Discretion unpacks the complexity of black men’s negotiation of gender ideals and non-normative sexual encounters, while being attentive to how these moves are (re) scripted in popular culture and media.  McCune has begun work on two new manuscript projects. The first, Reading Black Men: New Ways of Seeing, a monograph which uses performance theory to investigate other ways of “knowing” black men beyond “canonical prejudice.” This work provides a new lens to approach the study of race and gender, toward an ethics of care and critical generosity. His second new research project is a tri-city study of LGBT transitional homes that primarily serve youth of color, tentatively titled, Something Like a Home: An Ethnography of Transition. This book investigates the meaning of “home” for LGBT youth of color, exploring how race, gender, and sexuality complicate individual lives and service agencies involved in homeless care. Profile 

Mireille Miller-Young (Co-Convener)

Mireille Miller-Young

Mireille Miller-Young is an Associate Professor in the Department of Feminist Studies and Affiliate Professor of Black Studies, Film and Media Studies, and Comparative Literature at University of California, Santa Barbara. A former University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellow, her research explores sexual media and economies in the U.S. and African Diaspora, with a special interest in the intersections between labor, visual culture, and social history. She is currently working on a manuscript titled A Taste for Brown Sugar: Black Women, Sex Work, and Pornography (Duke University Press), which examines black women’s representations, performances, and labors in the adult entertainment industry. She is an editor of The Feminist Porn Book: The Politics of Producing Pleasure (The Feminist Press, 2013), with Constance Penley, Celine Parreñas Shimizu, and Tristan Taormino. Dr. Miller-Young has presented her academic work nationally and internationally, including in the Netherlands, the UK, Spain, France, and Brazil, and is frequently a featured speaker at sex-positive activist conferences like CatalystCon, Sex Summit, and The Feminist Porn Conference. She has published in Sexualities, Meridians: Feminism, Race and Transnationalism, Blackness and Sexualities, Pornification: Sex and Sexuality in Media Culture, and C’Lick Me: A Netporn Studies Reader. In addition, she has written essays for Feminist Theory, Colorlines, The New York Times, and $pread, a sex worker produced magazine. She is a founder of the New Sexualities Research Focus Group at UC Santa Barbara and the co-convener of the Black Sexual Economies Project at Washington University School of Law. Profile 

Matt Richardson

Matt Richardson

Matt Richardson is Assistant Professor in English, the Center for African and African American Studies, and the Center for Women's and Gender Studies.  He holds a Ph.D. in African Diaspora Studies & Emphasis in Women's and Gender Studies from the University of California-Berkeley.  He has published articles in Sexuality Research and Social Policy: Journal of the NSRC and The Journal of Women’s History, as well as works of fiction in publications like Pharos and Does Your Mama Know: African American Coming Out Stories.  He received the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship National Fellowship for Junior Faculty and the Dean’s Fellowship in 2009. Profile 

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