[Recorded in dialect form]
Filmore Taylor Hancock

Ol' Governor Phelps folks were our neighbors, in time of the Civil War. My ol' marster Hancock and the Phelps all lived up near Springfield, Missouri. Young John S. Phelps, was the son of Governer Phelps, and was colonel of the Second Arkansas Regiment.

Ol' Quantrill was a sort of rebel who kept outen the way of all the big armies. He didn' 'blong to nary side, but he had his own gang of two hundred or theree hundred men. They went everywhere and robbed and killed to suit themselves.

Quantrill killed 36 of this Arkansas Regiment, someplace on this dies of Yellville. The were buried in Arkansas. I was staying with Colonel Phelps, who was at his home near Springfield at the time. Those of Colonel Phelps' men in Arkansas, came back to get the rest of Phelps regiment, and went to find Quantrill, but he had already left, and they could not find him.

I was told, at that time, that Quantrill wanted to "get even" with some Union men in Leavenworth, Kansas, and killed one hundred white folks and sixty-three niggers.

Ol' Senator Elkins, who lived up North Missouri, was hated by Quantrill. Cole Younger and two other men were detailed by Quantrill to kill Senator Elkins. Now Cole Younger had gone to school to Elkins, before he was ever made Senator, when Elkins taught school up in North Missouri.

Younger had to obey Quantrill, so he caught Elkins, and told him to run, when they fired the guns in the air. Which Elkins did, and got away.

After the War, when Elkins became senator, and Cole Younger had spent 26 years in the Stillwater Prison in Pennsylvania, for robbing a bank. But some how or other Elkins managed to get Younger free, because he had befriended him, when Quantrill had had three men "detailed" to "drop back" and kill him.

Elkins had Younger visit him in his home and gave a big banquet in his honor.

end first part of narrative

Forgive misspellings. Second part of the narrative is more than 10 pages of dense dialect; I won't be able to retype that in email...

Sorry for the delays,
Anne