Slave Narratives

from the Rawick Papers, Series 5
 Bolden, Mary
 Troy, Missouri 

Western Historical Manuscripts Collection
University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri
[Recorded by] Robert Scott
Silex, Missouri
October 2, 1936

The following story was told by Mary Martha Bolden of Troy, Missouri, to Robert Scott of Silex, Missouri, October 2, 1936:

"My father, Perry Linsey, and mother, Martha Martin, I think, were both born in Missouri but I don't know the date or place. They were married before the Civil War, and lived down near St. Charles. They had two children, a boy and myself. I was born on the John Linsey farm, six miles east of Troy on the 10th of June, 1861.

"When I was a small girl I can remember seeing the master and two other men whip three men slaves, for running off. The whipping was unmerciful.

"I don't remember so well how it happened but when the war was over and we wvere freed we were on Colonel Campbell's farm in St. Charles County. Soon afterwards we moved on a farm near Moscow Mills. I attended school at Moscow Mills. This fine school house was a frame building with split logs for seats. I used to get so tired of sitting all ben and humped over.

"I lived in that county until I was grown, and got to be an old maid. I married David A. Bolden who was born southwest of Hawk Point, that is it was Hawk Point then. We were married at my mother's house near Moscow Mills, on June 9, 1892. We were married by a Baptist minister, Reverend McCannen. After the wedding I stayed with my mother and my husband stayed in Troy working for Joe Shaper, on his farm.

Bolden, Mary Martha
Page 2

"Our wedding clothes were about the same as they were today. My husband wore a blue serge and what they call a square box style suit, and I wore just a plain dress. My mother gave us a big wedding supper after the ceremony.

"While I always loved children, my husband and I never had any children of our own. I never had the habit of using tobacco. I have been a Methodist nearly all of my life.

"A few years ago I lost my husband, and I moved to Troy in 1913, and lived here ever since. I have had a hard time of it to live, but I am to get a pension soon, for which I sure will be thankful.


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Document scanned by Carol Robinson.