WashULaw Intersession 2018

WashULaw - Intersession 2016


COURSE DIRECTORY and REGISTRATION


  • SESSION DATES: Monday, January 8, through Friday, January 12, 2018
    (see class times)
  • CREDIT: All law courses are 1 unit. The 1 unit counts toward a student's total spring semester units for purposes of full-time status (but does not count toward the spring semester units for purposes of determining if a law student is over the limit of 17 units). International Business through Olin Business School is a 3-credit course.
  • ELIGIBILITY TO ENROLL: Upper-level law students are eligible to take law courses, including 2L, 3L, LLM, JSD, and MLS students. Washington University graduate-level students and upper-level juniors and seniors are eligible (with permission from their departments). Only JD-students are eligible to take International Business. Students may take only one of these courses during the January Intersession.
  • TUITION: There is no additional charge beyond the spring semester tuition for full-time Washington University law students in degree programs or for visiting law students who are paying full-time tuition. Full-time non-law Washington University graduate students may not have to pay extra for a law school intersession course, but should confirm this with their department. For those who must pay tuition, the cost is $2,287.
  • PRE-REQUISITES: Read course descriptions carefully and take note of any pre-requisites, recommended courses, or other course eligibility requirements.
  • EXAMS: Most law courses require a take-home exam that will be available via MyLaw on the afternoon of Friday, Jan. 12, 2018, and will be due by 8:00 a.m. on Tuesday, Jan 17, 2018 (read the course descriptions for specifics about each course). MyLaw is web-based, so students are not required to be in St. Louis when taking an intersession exam.
  • REGISTRATION: Registration begins Monday, October 30 at 9:00 a.m., and ends on Monday, November 6 at 5:00 p.m. Interested students should click on the link found below under “INTERSESSION REGISTRATION FORM.” All students must indicate at least THREE choices when submitting the online form.
  • ENROLLMENT: Students will be notified of the course in which they are enrolled prior to the start of online registration for the regular Spring 2018 semester. Priority will be based on seniority (those graduating in May 2018 will have priority over others graduating later). There is no advantage to registering quickly, just as long as you register by the November 6th deadline.
  • AFTER THE REGISTRATION PERIOD: After November 6th, interested students should contact Elizabeth Walsh, Associate Dean for Student Life, at ewalsh@wustl.edu to ask about registering for an Intersession class.
  • DROP DEADLINE: The drop deadline for these courses is Friday, December 1, 2017 at 5:00 p.m.

INTERSESSION REGISTRATION FORM

The registration form will be available on Monday, October 30, at 9:00 a.m at this link.

[Deadline to submit: Monday, November 6, 2017. After this date, interested students should contact Elizabeth Walsh at ewalsh@wustl.edu.]


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ERISA Fiduciary Law [W74-598B]
Professor: Tom Clark
Drop Deadline: Friday, December 1, 2017. This 1 unit Intersession course will provide a substantive overview of ERISA fiduciary law that governs qualified retirement and welfare benefit plans. The sources of fiduciary law such as the ERISA statute, regulations, and Department of Labor guidance will be explained. Emphasis will be placed on the proper identification of fiduciaries, the fiduciary duties of prudence and loyalty, prohibited transactions and major exemptions, personal liability under the law, and the recent regulations regarding disclosure of fees and expenses. Special focus will be given to recent Supreme Court and Circuit Court cases that have significantly changed the ERISA fiduciary landscape. Finally, a brief overview will be provided of typical ERISA litigation that a student is likely to see in their future practices. The course will be relevant for any student interested in employee benefits, employment law, labor law, business law, or securities law as they will leave the course with the proper understanding of how to advise clients in avoiding the major compliance pitfalls of being an ERISA fiduciary. Class attendance is mandatory. Students are expected to thoroughly read any course materials and be well prepared prior to the start of the class. All reading materials will be provided prior to class on Blackboard and nothing will need to be purchased. The take-home final will be uploaded via the MyLaw take-home exam site. The exam will be available on the afternoon of Fri., Jan. 12, and will due by 8:00 a.m. on Tues., Jan. 16. This course is graded on the mandatory mean curve. 1 unit.

International Business [B63-512-01] – OLIN BUSINESS SCHOOL COURSE
Professor: David Meyer
[Note: This course is offered by the Olin Business School and is not a law school course. Olin permits up to 10 spots to be made available for JD students interested in the subject.] Examination of management strategies of global businesses. We use a network approach, though not exclusively, to understand firm strategies. Business networks are linked to knowledge clusters. Discussion of rationale for going global and internal organizational architectures and models that firms use for global management. Global strategy of firms influences their external networks and how they deal with technological change. Examination of how logistics and finance relate to global business strategy. Consideration of political-economy of business and global economic crisis. The course will have case dealing with a current strategic challenge of a global corporation. The company will present a problem/case on the first class day. Concurrently with the coverage of concepts of global business, selected class periods will cover themes applicable to the case. Students will propose a strategic solution in group case presentations to company executives on the last class day, and the executives will give their final reactions in the last period. Prerequisites: None, although some business course work or background is recommended. Grading: JD students will receive a letter grade (i.e., A, B, etc.) on their transcripts and will need to earn a grade of at least C in order for the credits to transfer to their JD. [This class is not open to non-JD law students.] 3 units. Credits from this course count toward the 19 maximum credits a J.D. student can take in non-law classroom unit courses, and toward the 6 credit limit in non-law graduate course credits.

Introduction to Corporate Finance [W74-539K]
Professor: Eileen Kamerick
Drop Deadline: Friday, December 1, 2017. [Note: Students who have taken Corporate Finance may not take this course. JD/MBA students are not eligible to take this course since there is substantial overlap with Financial Management (B62-5203), a required MBA course. Other JDs who have taken Financial Management are not eligible to take this course, and students who take this course are not eligible to take Financial Management.] This 1 unit Intersession course is designed to familiarize law students with the principles of corporate finance. In the world of corporate finance, the distinction between lawyers and investment bankers has become blurred. Whether negotiating a merger agreement, acquisition or divestiture, rendering a fairness opinion, preparing for an appraisal hearing, litigating a securities class action or derivative suits, issuing new securities, taking a firm private via an LBO or public via an IPO, corporate lawyers and investment bankers work side by side and lawyers with an appreciation of the basics of corporate finance are at a distinct advantage. In addition to the principles of finance, the course addresses the legal norms and economic constraints that affect a corporation's choice of capital structure. Topics include: the time value of money; the relation between risk and return; the workings and efficiency of the capital markets; behavioral finance; valuing corporate securities; optimal capital structure and dividend policies; basic financial accounting; and how these principals are applied in the practical practice of law. Students are expected to thoroughly read the course materials prior to the start of the class. Use of laptop computers in class is prohibited. Class attendance is mandatory. The exam will be available via MyLaw on the afternoon of Fri., Jan. 12, and will due by 8:00 a.m. on Tues., Jan. 16. This course is graded on the mandatory mean curve. 1 unit.

Introduction to Energy Law [W74-691E]
Professor: Justin Perryman
Drop Deadline: Friday, December 1, 2017. [Note: Students who have taken Introduction to Oil & Gas Law may not take this course.] This 1 unit Intersession course will examine the energy industry and its legal practices, unique regulations and future. We will explore the history of energy law dating back to the discovery of oil in the United States, the property and contract laws that developed due the bifurcation of property interests, the types of energy production and the trend toward cleaner energy resources, import and export of energy, and the practice of energy law . Included are concepts as to the nature of a landowner's interest in oil and gas; the creation and duration of mineral leases; the oil and gas lease and rights and obligations created thereby; production payments and division orders; pooling and unitization; ethics; basic taxation; pollution liability; rights and duties between mineral and surface owners; protection of interests in oil and gas properties against trespassers and wrongful claimants; agreements among oil companies, including lease assignments, farmouts and joint operating agreements; and issues concerned with raising funds for oil and gas projects. Trending legal issues in traditional agreements, which were drafted in the context of vertical wells, in order to conform them to horizontal drilling and fracking operations. Environmental issues including those raised by fracking, fossil fuels and the struggles of implementation of clean energy in the United States. Various regulations of drilling and production will also be covered. The exam will be available via MyLaw on the afternoon of Fri., Jan. 12, and will due by 8:00 a.m. on Tues., Jan. 16. This course is graded on the mandatory mean curve. 1 unit.

Introduction to Law Firm Practice [W74-561E]
Professor: Michael Downey
Drop Deadline: Friday, December 1, 2017. Most law school graduates enter private practice. This course attempts to prepare them for some of the daily challenges they will encounter in a law firm setting by teaching how law firms are structured, how they generate revenue and compensate lawyers, and how they develop business. It will also discuss issues such as what law firms value, how lawyers bill time, and how to deal with co-workers and clients. Teaching methods will include group discussions, role play and other creative techniques. Attendance is mandatory. Grading will be based primarily upon a reflective journal, as well as upon class participation. Grading will not be anonymous. The journal will be uploaded via the MyLaw take-home exam site. This course is graded on the mandatory mean curve. 1 unit.

Municipal Finance Transactions [W74-]
Professor: Erick Creach
Drop Deadline: Friday, December 1, 2017. This 1-credit Intersession course will examine from a practical perspective the issues (state and federal law) and documentation arising in a typical municipal financing transaction, using a mixture of lectures, statutes and regulations, regulatory actions and secondary sources. The course will begin with a basic introduction to municipal financing, including the roles of the various participants, and will then focus on the structure, documentation, and regulation of a typical municipal financing transaction. Overall, the course is intended as an introduction to municipal financing transactions, rather than an in-depth analysis of any particular area of law. Time will be set aside for discussions about current events and careers in the municipal financing industry. Attendance is mandatory. There will be a take-home exam administered via MyLaw. The exam will be available on the afternoon of Fri., Jan. 12, and will due by 8:00 a.m. on Tues., Jan. 16. This course is graded on the mandatory mean curve. 1 unit.

Private Equity Transactions [W74-566C]
Professor: Brian Wolfe
Drop Deadline: Friday, December 1, 2017. This course will examine from a practical perspective the issues and documentation arising in a typical private equity acquisition transaction, using a mixture of lectures, cases and guest speakers. The course will begin with a basic introduction to the private equity industry, including the roles of the various business and legal participants, and will then focus on the structure, negotiation and documentation of a private equity investment transaction. Overall, the course is intended as a survey/introductory course, rather than an in-depth analysis of any particular area of law or type of document. Time will be set aside for discussions about current events and careers in the private equity industry. Attendance is mandatory. Class attendance, preparation, and participation are expected and may be taken into consideration in the final grade. There will be a take-home exam administered via MyLaw. The exam will be available on the afternoon of Fri., Jan. 12, and will due by 8:00 a.m. on Tues., Jan. 16. This course is graded on the mandatory mean curve. 1 unit.

Click here to see Faculty Profiles. 


QUESTIONS? CONTACT

Elizabeth Walsh, Associate Dean of Student Life, at ewalsh@wustl.edu