Office of the Law School Registrar:
Course Directory:
SEMINARS - Spring 2000


Registration: Students interested in taking a seminar should complete a preregistration form and return it to the Registrar's Office (Room 303) by Friday, April 2, 1999 (or after the pre-registration period, submit a note to the Registrar's Office). Enrollment or waitlist confirmation notices are distributed to students requesting seminars.

Limitations on withdrawal from seminars: Students wishing to drop a seminar after the seminar has had its first meeting must obtain permission from the instructor to withdraw from the seminar. Note that it may be difficult to obtain instructor permission to withdraw from any oversubscribed seminar after the time has passed during which the instructor will permit another student to enroll.

The research and writing requirement: All students, except those in the Class of 2000 who are exempted by four semesters of Journal or Quarterly participation, are required to receive credit in one seminar.  (Supervised Research does not fulfill the research and writing requirement.)

Two types of seminars: For many years, we have distinguished the course seminar from the writing seminar. Both types of seminars fulfill the research and writing requirement. Generally, course seminars meet once per week throughout the semester. Writing seminars may or may not meet as a group; see course description, first class assignment or professor for details on meetings. Students are encouraged to read the course  descriptions carefully for seminar requirements. [Note: the faculty recently changed its policy of categorizing seminars as either writing or course seminars.  Beginning with the 2000-2001 course directory, seminars will no longer be so designated and the structure of each seminar will be explained in detail within the description of each seminar.]


COMMON LAW DYNAMICS SEMINAR
David Gerber
W76-706S sec 01
3 hrs  -  Course Seminar
FRI 10:00 - 12:00
This course will use an historical perspective to explore the factors that influence the operation of Common Law systems. The objective will be to identify and understand the factors that influence decision making in the Common Law systems of the England and the United States. We will look carefully at some of the critical periods in the evolution of these systems and at how they shaped the operation of Common Law systems today. Students will be required to write a paper.

COMPARATIVE CORPORATE GOVERNANCE SEMINAR
Curtis Milhaupt
COURSE CANCELED

FEMINIST LEGAL THEORY SEMINAR
Martha Chamallas
W76-692S sec 01
(3 hrs)
MON 3:00 - 5:00 p.m. - Course Seminar
Enrollment limit: 20
This seminar investigates a variety of feminist approaches to law and the study of legal culture. The seminar treats such contemporary topics as the debate over the meaning of equality, the comparison of liberal, radical, "different voice" and postmodern strands of feminist thought and the intersections among gender subordination and subordination based on race and sexual orientation. A research paper will be required.

INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE COMPETITION LAW SEMINAR
Dorsey Ellis
W76-702S sec 01
(3 hrs)
MON 3:00 - 5:00 p.m.  (Course Seminar)
Enrollment limit: 20
Explores the international reach of American antitrust laws and the application of antitrust principles of the European union and other nations. This is a course seminar that will meet weekly. Students will be expected to write and present two papers. Grades primarily will be based upon the papers, but class participation will be taken into account. There will be an attendance policy.

INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW & POLICY SEMINAR
Dorsey Ellis
W76-703S sec 01
(3 hrs)
MON 3:00 - 5:00 p.m. - (Writing Seminar; may or may not meet at this time; see course description, first class assignment or professor for details.)
Enrollment limit: 16
This seminar will permit students to explore in depth, in a scholarly paper comparable to a law review note, a legal problem related to international environmental policy. Papers might be on a subject pertaining to an international treaty [convention] (e.g. Nuclear Non-proliferation; Antarctic; UN on Law of the Sea, NAFTA, etc.) declaration (e.g. Stockholm, Rio, etc) or dispute, or might suggest a policy for the resolution or amelioration of an international environmental problem. Papers will proceed through topic definition, detailed outline, and at least two drafts. The seminar may meet as a group at the beginning of the semester; individual conferences are mandatory. There are no prerequisites for this seminar, although students who have taken or are taking International Law or Environmental Law will benefit. (Students who have not taken either course will not be disadvantaged in the evaluation of their written work.)

INTERNATIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW SEMINAR
Charles McManis
W76-705S sec 01
(3 hrs)
MON 3:00 - 5:00 p.m. - (Course Seminar)
Enrollment limit: 20
This seminar will basically explore the international impact of the TRIPS (i.e. Trade-related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) Agreement, which was adopted in 1994 as a part of the Uruguay Round of GATT negotiations (the same round of multilateral trade negotiations that brought about the new World Trade Organization, which overseas implementation and enforcement of the TRIPS Agreement). As a part of that overall study, the seminar will also examine the two "Great Conventions" of the 19th Century (i.e. the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property, and the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works), and various subsequent and subsidiary multilateral agreements, such as the Trademark Law Treaty and the Nice Agreement Concerning International Classification of Goods and Services, the Rome Convention for the Protection of Performers, Producers of Phonograms and Broadcasting Organizations, the Patent Cooperation Treaty, and most recently, the WIPO Copyright Treaty and Proposed Database Protection Treaty. Finally, the seminar will examine various regional harmonization agreements, such as the NAFTA Agreement and various European Union Directives, as well as provisions of U.S. law, such as "Special 301," which are designed as national enforcement tools. The seminar will be taught by means of a casebook containing a series of practical problems for which weekly written responses will be required. These papers will constitute the entire work requirement for the course. Regular class attendance and preparation are, of course, required.

INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT LAW SEMINAR
Peter Mutharika
W76-612S sec 01
(3 hrs)
MON 3:00 - 5:00 p.m. - (Writing Seminar; may or may not meet at this time; see course description, first class assignment or professor for details.)
Enrollment limit: 16
Introduction to current legal relationships between foreign investors and entities (both governmental and nongovernmental) in the investee estate and examination of the legal factors that influence an investment decision and how investment agreements are structured. Among the topics to be considered are U.S. and foreign investment laws and regulations, investment restrictions and incentives, currency controls, licensing, joint business ventures, expropriation and compensation, settlement of investment disputes, transnational corporations, and codes of conduct. Students will be required to write a paper of publishable quality. There will be one group meeting at the beginning of the semester. After that, I will hold individual conferences at various intervals to discuss topic selection, abstract and outline, and partial draft.

LEGAL ETHICS SEMINAR
Kathleen Clark
W78-627S sec 01
(3 hrs)
MON 3:00 - 5:00 p.m. - (Writing Seminar; may or may not meet at this time; see course description, first class assignment or professor for details.)
Enrollment limit: 16
This course is a part of the Ethics Curriculum. Students in this course will write a research paper of publishable quality in the field of legal ethics. Students will meet individually with the instructor to discuss the progress of their research, and will need to turn in a research proposal, an outline, a preliminary draft as well as the final paper. There are no prerequisites for this course.

POLITICAL ECONOMY OF SOCIAL SECURITY REFORM SEMINAR
Nancy Staudt
W76-704S sec 01
(3 hrs)
WED 3:00 - 5:00 p.m. - (Course Seminar)
Enrollment limit: 20
The social security system is widely believed to be in crisis. Although currently running a surplus, the trust funds will be depleted by the year 2069 potentially leaving many retirees without the federal pensions promised to them. The crisis, often couched in terms of numbers, raises a number of fundamental issues that underlie our philosophy of social insurance in the 21st century. In this seminar, we will explore how big the crisis really is, analyze various reform proposals, and investigate the politics that underlie much of the contemporary debates.

REORGANIZATION SEMINAR
Daniel Keating, Hon. Barry Schermer, Lloyd Palans
W76-646S sec 01
(3 hrs)
MON 3:00 - 5:00 p.m. - (Course Seminar)
Enrollment limit: 20
(BUSINESS REORGANIZATIONS UNDER CHAPTER 11)
This course will be taught jointly by Professor Keating, United States Bankruptcy Judge Barry Schermer and Lloyd Palans of Bryan Cave. The primary focus of the class will be reorganizations under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code. Using a single hypothetical reorganization as a backdrop, the instructors will take students through the various stages of a Chapter 11 case, from the initial filing with the bankruptcy court to confirmation of a plan of reorganization. The class will meet once each week during the semester for two hours each session. Students' grades will be determined by their performance on simulated exercises and written assignments and by their participation in class discussion. Attendance and preparation are both required. Students who have not taken the basic Bankruptcy course may enroll, but they will be at a marked disadvantage to those students who have. Taking the basic Bankruptcy course concurrently with this seminar will not significantly reduce that disadvantage.